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  • Top 10 most popular types of burgers on Canadian restaurant menus
    Robberecht Jordan Knox Go Top 10 most popular types of burgers By Kristin Menas May 8 2014 Tweet Leave a comment Specialty burgers beef up Canadian menus According to Technomic s MenuMonitor database specialty burgers are the most popular burgers on Canadian menus with 242 appearances Specialty burgers allow operators to distinguish their menu from those of competitors Many specialty burgers feature spicy flavours thanks to ingredients like jalapeños pepper Jack cheese hot sauce or chipotle flavoured condiments Ethnic flavours are also emerging on many burger menus such as the Greek Burger at Brewsters Brewing Company Restaurant the Tex Mex Fajita Burger at Gabby s and the Jamaican Jerk Burger at The Works Gourmet Burger Bistro The second most popular type of burger is the bacon cheeseburger appearing 102 times on menus The combination of cheese and bacon on a burger provides an indulgent option that goes beyond the classic hamburger or cheeseburger While the bacon cheeseburger is nothing new to Canadian burger fans some operators are updating this classic getting creative with the way they serve up bacon cheeseburgers by using higher quality meats double bacon and interesting condiments For example The Pickle Barrel offers its P B House Burger made with Canadian cheddar applewood smoked bacon housemade craft beer battered onion rings specialty sauce lettuce tomato and pickle on a brioche bun Rounding out the top four types of burgers are the classic hamburger and cheeseburger respectively These classics are essentials for many Canadian operators appealing to a wide range of diners The most popular ingredients featured on hamburgers are traditional toppings such as tomatoes lettuce onions and pickles Some of the leading cheeses used on cheeseburgers are cheddar and mozzarella See also A look at emerging desserts influencing restaurant menus Bread brings in the dough as most

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/top10mostpopularburgers.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Five techniques for turning your restaurant staff into a high performing team
    terms of performance what support they can expect to receive from others and how their work impacts the team and the restaurant as a whole There are three formal ways you should communicate this information to your staff job descriptions competencies and goals Every staff member should have a clear job description that outlines their roles and responsibilities in the restaurant They should also understand the roles and responsibilities of other staff members By having a clear understanding of their role as well as everyone else s each staff member will understand their interdependence Staff members also need to understand the competencies that are important to high performance and success in their role You may have core competencies for your restaurant that help establish your distinct character or culture as well as competencies for individual roles Employees need to know how you want them to work and what you value as a team and an organization Finally it s important for every employee to have clear individual goals that link to the overall goals for the restaurant Every team member needs to know what they are expected to accomplish and how their work is helping the team and the restaurant achieve its goals This goal alignment helps build commitment accountability engagement and high performance 2 Train and cross train staff To build a high performing team it s important to provide everyone with training in their particular role Training should be used to address skill gaps and should also broaden or deepen existing skills or develop new ones And remember training takes many forms It can include formal classroom training as well as job shadowing mentoring reading observation webcasts podcasts etc Different training media help you accommodate your staff s learning style and availability When you re building a high performance team it s also important to cross train team members Cross training allows an individual to walk in someone else s shoes and gives them a broader understanding of the workplace and team It s a great tool for building team relationships and strengths You could have a waitress work a few shifts bussing tables or doing prep in the kitchen It s also great to get managers back in the trenches doing their employees work Cross training staff in this way invariably gives them a better understanding and deeper appreciation of the challenges their team mates face and results in better teamwork and communication It also results in a stronger more nimble workforce who can fill in for one another in a pinch 3 Give staff ongoing feedback and coaching Every employee needs to hear on a regular basis what they are doing well where they can improve and if there s anything they should stop doing By giving all your employees ongoing feedback and coaching you help improve their individual performance as well as the team s 4 Gather feedback on performance from team mates and patrons In a restaurant with its busy work environment and varied

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/restaurantstaffperformance.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Employee happiness: Why it matters in the restaurant and hospitality business
    than unhappy ones They consistently show up for work are less likely to resign go above and beyond and attract likeminded people to your business In an environment where nearly nine out of 10 of the workforce are actively looking for a new job having a stable and productive staff provides significant competitive advantage Happy employees are 31 per cent more productive their sales are 37 per cent higher and their creativity is 300 per cent greater How do you create an environment where your employee say great things about your organization stay employed with you and strive to do their best every day Share information openly In order for employees to contribute to the organization in a meaningful way it is critical they understand your broader organizational goals and the role they play in achieving those goals Not only does sharing instil a sense of purpose but it encourages teamwork and innovation through collaboration Pre shift meetings and regularly scheduled employee newsletters are excellent mechanisms for sharing information Be sure to let them know how the business is doing as it relates to areas within their control Empower decision making Employees who have authority to make decisions are more creative face fewer roadblocks and are more engaged knowing they can contribute in a meaningful way Empowering your team to take care of your guests using their discretion with parameters of course not only improves service but employee engagement as well Create a culture of respect Almost three quarters of workers have been exposed to workplace incivility Bullying and harassment is a major issue that negatively affects workplaces and reduces productivity Respect is contagious Hire for it expect it and reward it Provide frequent consistent feedback By nature we re all competitive and we all care about what others think

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/whyemployeehappinessmatters.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Driving employee engagement to increase earnings
    they have probably checked out from their work The remaining employees who make up roughly two thirds are moderately engaged at best These moderately engaged employees represent a huge opportunity cost to the employer with regard to productivity morale and financial results Companies with the highest percentage of engaged workers the study reports make more money In a 12 month study across 50 companies companies with the highest percentage of engaged workers had a 19 per cent increase in operating incomes and a 28 per cent increase in earnings per share On the other hand over the same year period companies with the lowest employee engagement rates showed a 33 per cent decline in operating incomes and an 11 per cent decline in earnings per share Studies have shown that engaged employees contribute fully to the success of the organization and have a high level of job satisfaction For these employees personal and organizational interests are aligned In addition they have a clear vision of their own future and on the organization s mission and goals An engaged employee It has been said that engaged employees plan to stay with their employer for what they give while the disengaged stay for what they get The characteristics an engaged employee include Looks for and is given opportunities to improve organizational performance Is positive about the job and the organization Believes in the organization Works actively to make things better Treats others with respect and helps colleagues to perform more effectively Can be relied upon and goes beyond the requirements of the job Sees the bigger picture Identifies with the organization Keeps up to date with developments in his her field Drivers for employee engagement A positive on boarding experience Trust and integrity Nature of the job they are asked to perform

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/EngagingEmployees.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Top 20 factors for success in the restaurant business.
    measure the success of each marketing program 7 Quality food You re only as successful as your last meal 8 Quality service You re only as good as your last customer interaction Do you talk about good service or does everyone in your organization understand it and live it 9 Flawless execution Do all the elements of the experience you expect to provide to your customers come together every hour of every day How do you know Do you take action to make sure that they do 10 Customer data Do you really know your customers their demographic profile their needs and their preferences 11 Customer feedback Do you actively encourage customers to provide feedback at the time they are served and do you act on any negative experiences immediately 12 Empowered staff Do your staff members know how to manage the customer experience and take action when an experience fails to meet the customer s expectations Do you make sure this happens 13 Realistic financial formula Does the through put of your restaurant allow you to generate sufficient revenues to meet fixed costs and profit expectations after all variable costs are covered 14 Menus engineered to yield optimum gross margin You bank dollars not percentages Does your menu steer customers to selecting the menu items that yield the highest gross margin 15 Maximum buying leverage There is a big difference between street price and the price you pay for food and supplies when you maximize your purchasing leverage Consider one stop shopping buying groups and volume management 16 Labour balanced to demand To open the doors you require a basic labour complement This constitutes your fixed labour cost Profits are often squandered through poor scheduling of variable labour costs representing the additional labour you need to meet anticipated demand

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/Top20factorsforsuccessintherestaurant.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • The five colossal mistakes hiring managers make in the foodservice and hospitality business
    and potential versus past experience A better approach Look for career growth before experience Evaluate the candidate s ability to learn grow and work with others not just how many years of experience they have Mistake 2 Relying too much on education We have all seen resumes of people with multiple advanced degrees and diplomas Education alone is not an indicator of future success It only demonstrates that the candidate is capable of getting an education Avoid Choosing between candidates simply because one has more education It doesn t mean the highly educated candidate is better than all the other candidates that don t have all those impressive letters beside their name A better approach Get the candidates to talk about examples of what they have accomplished and how they have interacted with customers peers and done the kind of tasks you need for the position A better approach Give the candidate scenarios of situations likely to arise in your business and ask them to give examples of how they personally would respond Mistake 3 Being dazzled by the halo effect Sometimes we just click with a candidate and build instant rapport during an interview Be very careful to differentiate between someone you like or admire versus someone who is a good fit for the role Avoid Making your hiring decision based on gut feel That halo may make you forget to focus on some basic competency areas A better approach Use a consistent template to rate all of the required skills for the position so as not to be swayed by your personal biases Mistake 4 Fall for someone with the gift of the gab Especially in the hospitality business keep in mind these candidates are experts in building rapport and selling In the case of servers and bartenders

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/mistakeshiringmanagersmake.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Common accidents in the restaurant industry
    by workers as a result of workplace accidents are of even greater importance than the financial costs Four most common types of accidents in the restaurant industry 1 Being struck by an object 24 per cent These are accidents where the worker is injured by a moving object such as equipment and tools Being struck by an object or equipment causes 24 per cent of the restaurant industry s accepted time loss claims Accidents with a knife account for more than 60 percent of these struck by accidents Occupations with the most struck by accidents are Chefs and cooks 46 per cent Kitchen helpers or bus persons 33 per cent 2 Falls on the same level 18 per cent Falls on the same level account for 18 per cent of all time loss claims Seventy per cent are caused by slippery surfaces and 5 per cent are due to tripping or rough surfaces Women have claims for falls on the same level two and a half times more often than men Example of an accident A kitchen helper slips on some grease while putting French fries into a deep fryer His right hand goes into the fryer resulting in a third degree burn Occupations with the most falls on the same level are Kitchen helpers or bus persons 35 per cent Wait staff 27 per cent Chefs and cooks 22 per cent 3 Burns and scalds 16 per cent Sixteen percent of all accidents in restaurants are burns and scalds Contact with food products for example soup tea sauces account for 39 per cent of these burns and scalds and 35 per cent are the result of contact with fat grease or oil Occupations with the most burns are Chefs and cooks 43 per cent Kitchen helpers or bus persons

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/Commonaccidentsinrestaurantindustry.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Is your restaurant ready for Canada’s new anti-spam law (CASL)?
    of electronic message casts a wide enough net to capture any means of telecommunication including a text sound voice or image message That means emails text messages phone calls instant messaging and social media communications are all covered The biggest exception to this general prohibition is where you have express or implied consent from the recipient to send him or her the message but that s not as straightforward as it might sound First each commercial electronic message must include clearly and prominently the following information name and contact information of sender whether the message is being sent on behalf of another person and an unsubscribe mechanism which enables the recipient to unsubscribe without incurring any cost and by using the same means by which the message was sent Certain relationships are automatically exempted from the requirement to obtain consent including friends and family a defined term which oddly doesn t include siblings responding to an inquiry related to your commercial activity or providing a quote if requested messages sent between employees representatives consultants or franchisees of the same organization messages sent to provide notice of a legal right or obligation messages sent by charities and political parties So what if you don t neatly fall into one of those exemptions Then you need either express or implied consent from the recipient Express consent is straightforward enough to establish but there is a certain amount of information you re required to provide when seeking that consent Implied consent is a bit murkier and can be identified where the sender has an existing business or non business relationship with the recipient Of note to the restaurant industry an existing business relationship includes a business relationship arising from the purchase of a product within two years before the message was sent the

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/Canadasnewantispamlaw.aspx (2016-02-14)
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