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  • Chef Giussepe Pino Posteraro, Cioppino’s Mediterranean Grill & Enoteca
    was hard to watch them suffer That s when I realized that there was nothing more rewarding or energizing than working in foodservice This realization led him to Canada to work in his brother s restaurant and then on a world tour to hone his craft at a number of well known restaurants in Europe and Singapore In 1999 Posteraro decided to branch out on his own opening Cioppino s Mediterranean Grill in Vancouver s trendy Yaletown and a year later opening Enoteca Cioppino s wine library next door In 2007 Posteraro won the prestigious Gold Medal Plate for Vancouver Voted Vancouver Magazine s Best Formal Italian Restaurant nine years running Posteraro obviously has Italian cuisine down pat which is why he gets frustrated by the way Italian dishes are often presented in North American restaurants There are so many misconceptions he says A huge one is dividing the cuisine into North and South There are 21 different authentic regional cuisines in Italy And each region does things differently so that division is way too reductive It s like watching the Sopranos and saying that all Italians eat with spoons What makes something a truly authentic Italian dish Here are a few key things First it is imperative to do your homework Travel to Italy Read books Seek out an authentic Italian experience he says If you don t it s like me even being a professional chef wanting to make Turkish food but having never been to Turkey or eaten Turkish food How can I even begin to understand How will I understand the cultural way of doing things Secondly keep things simple The reason Italian food gets a little bit disastrous is because people tend to improvise and forget that less is more explains Posteraro For example it

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/ChefGiussepePinoPosteraro.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • CRFA Restaurant Outlook Survey: Restaurant owners optimistic that the next six months will bring improved sales
    Knox Go Survey Restaurateurs cautiously optimistic about the future By Chris Elliott August 3 2011 Leave a comment Canada s restaurant owners are guardedly optimistic that the next six months will bring improved sales according to CRFA s first ever Restaurant Outlook Survey Results show that nearly 30 per cent of restaurants owners believe their same store sales will grow at a greater rate over the next six months compared to the previous six More than half 52 5 per cent of restaurateurs however expect to maintain the same sales growth rate over the next six months while two in 10 expect sales to expand at a slower pace Factors impacting restaurants Despite signs of optimism these are turbulent times for restaurant owners who face many challenges In the survey eight in 10 restaurant owners stated rising food costs are having a negative impact on their business two thirds of operators noted rising labour costs are hurting business and only two per cent of operators say no factors are negatively affecting business Flat sales dominate Q2 More than half 54 8 per cent of respondents blamed a weak economy for their sales performance This combined with a decline in tourists

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/CRFARestaurantOutlookSurvey.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Canada’s economy hits a speed bump
    a comment Canada s economy contracted by an annualized 0 4 in Q2 of 2011 the first quarterly decline since the recession in 2009 Analysts had expected flat economic activity in the second quarter following healthy gains in the first A deteriorating global economy is largely to blame as Canadian exports tumbled by an annualized 8 3 in the second quarter The good news is that the domestic side of the economy expanded by a respectable 3 0 due to increased business investment and consumer spending However it s unlikely Canadian businesses and consumers will be able to sustain this growth over the near term given the current economic problems in the United States and Europe Roadblocks in the economy Here is a rundown of where things stand The recent crisis of investor confidence about the economic growth and fiscal debt of the United States and Europe has led to volatility in equity markets Consumer confidence in Canada and the U S has fallen to two year lows Disposable income in Canada cooled to 1 6 growth in the second quarter compared to a 5 0 increase in the first At the same time consumers are seeing higher price tags for gasoline and food both of which are rising at a faster pace than disposable income In its latest forecast the Bank of Montreal has downgraded its outlook for the Canadian and U S economies from March projections Due to a weaker global economy Canada s economy is now forecast to grow by 2 4 and 2 3 in 2011 and 2012 TD Economics latest Quarterly Economic Update puts the possibility of a U S recession at 40 The path ahead for Canada s restaurant industry As the foodservice industry is closely tied to the health of the economy it

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/CanadaeconomyQ22011.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Conference Board of Canada: Canada’s food sector has a nourishing impact on economy and employment
    cent of Canadian gross domestic product GDP In all 2 3 million jobs in Canada approximately 13 per cent of employment are dependent on the food sector incorporating businesses as diverse as restaurants grocery stores retail shops distribution services food manufacturing and primary producers Most industries in Canada are to some extent involved in the process of growing processing transporting and distributing food Valuing Food The Economic Contribution of Canada s Food Sector is the first publication of the Centre for Food in Canada a three year Conference Board program of research and dialogue that will develop a framework for a Canadian food strategy We have the opportunity today to create the conditions that will support the food sector s growth as an economic engine while also contributing to safe and healthy food choices sustaining our environment and providing greater access to food in Canada and around the globe said Anne Golden President and CEO The Conference Board of Canada A more modern and effective food sector could become an even greater force for economic and social good than it is today The full economic impact or footprint of the food sector assesses the supply chains used to support domestic consumption and those used for exports of food and food products Using Statistics Canada s detailed model of the industrial structure of Canada s economy the analysis quantifies the economy wide impact of food produced in Canada for domestic consumption The same exercise is used to estimate the impact of food destined for export In 2010 16 4 per cent of total Canadian consumption spending was on food defined as expenditures on food and non alcoholic beverages alcohol consumption and spending at restaurants the equivalent of 4 538 annually for every man woman and child in Canada Food for domestic

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/CanadasfoodsectorConferenceBoardofCanada.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Institutional foodservice to grow 4.8% in Canada in 2013
    strains to meet demand The sales of branded foodservice concepts such as Tim Horton s and Subway are tracked by the CRFA and Statistics Canada under Commercial Foodservice Sales Quick Services Restaurants and as such are not included in Institutional Foodservice The use of branded foodservice concepts is increasing in hospitals which has dampened other retail healthcare foodservice sales growth to some extent Correctional foodservice sales are expected to experience significant growth in 2012 and 2013 These increases are driven by rising costs and growing inmate populations at federal facilities as a result of the government s tougher stance on crime Transportation foodservices were expected to grow significantly in 2012 and moderately in 2013 While train and ferry traffic declined in 2012 a modest recovery is expected in 2013 Airline traffic showed considerable growth in 2012 and cruise ship traffic increased significantly on the west coast and at the Port of Quebec in 2012 These trends are expected to continue in 2013 Business dining sales are expected to decline in 2013 The total number of business locations in Canada was expected to increase but number of private sector businesses offering foodservices is decreasing due to businesses cutting costs and consolidation of offices High school foodservices have been strongly impacted by declining enrolments since 2008 in many provinces as well as the continuing introduction of legislation guidelines to eliminate the sale of less healthy foods in schools Per capita spending has also declined significantly Sales declined substantially in 2012 but were expected to show some modest growth in 2013 as operators sort out responses to the new nutritional guidelines Remote foodservices experienced a dampening of growth in 2009 at the onset of the economic recession As prices dropped for oil and demand for resources stalled resourced based industries reigned in costs

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/InstitutionalfoodserviceCanada2013.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Canada's restaurant employment moderates in 2012
    Elliott CRFA Senior Economist January 29 2013 Tweet Leave a comment Net employment in Canada s restaurant industry rose 0 7 per cent to 1 126 200 in 2012 according to a Labour Force Survey by Statistics Canada This growth of 7 200 jobs represents a moderation in restaurant employment since 2011 In that year the foodservice industry came in second for employment growth among all sectors with the creation of 28 000 jobs Ontario leads restaurant job creation Growth in restaurant employment was mixed across Canada in 2012 Ontario led the country with 20 900 new jobs bringing total employment in the province to 425 100 Following the loss of 1 400 jobs in 2011 Nova Scotia bounced back with net employment climbing 2 600 Employment also rose in Alberta Manitoba and New Brunswick The HST and stricter drinking and driving legislation caused the loss of 7 200 jobs in British Columbia In Quebec employment fell by 9 500 following an increase of 8 900 jobs in 2011 Employment also dropped slightly in Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador while job growth was flat on Prince Edward Island Mining oil and gas extraction takes top spot The leading job generator

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/Canadarestaurantemployment2012.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Top 10 techniques and tips for healthy options on your restaurant's menu
    in all food categories from starters to desserts Top 10 techniques and tips for healthy options on your menu Offer choices that are healthy AND delicious According to the 2010 Canadian Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report by Technomic only 17 per cent of Canadian consumers feel that food described as healthy does not taste as good as other options The Canadian Council of Food and Nutrition reports that taste is the number one factor in how Canadians choose the food they eat but nutrition is a close second Experiment and use kitchen creativity Give them the facts Provide nutrition information as much as possible such as calories fat and sodium for your guests to help them make an informed decision Watch the fat Use lesser amounts of fat and healthier types of oil like olive or canola as ingredients and in food preparation and cooking Use low fat ingredients or substitutions in recipes and employ healthier cooking methods like roasting poaching grilling and steaming Add flavour and nutrition by using broth juices and fruit and vegetable purees in dressings and sauces Also skim fat from stock trim fat from meats and remove skin from poultry Shake the salt habit Canadians are being encouraged to reduce their salt intake You can help by minimizing the use of processed foods that are high in salt using fresh or frozen ingredients when possible or looking for no or low salt alternatives Limit the amount of salt added in prep and cooking by exploring a variety of herbs spices and other salt free seasonings as well as layering flavours during food preparation and cooking Keep it simple Use simple back to basics prep and cooking methods to minimize added fat and sodium and maintain the nutritional integrity of foods If needed add well proportioned

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/healthymenuoptions.aspx (2016-02-14)
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  • Tips for restaurants to cut back on salt, sodium
    same report also reveals that nutrition is a pretty close second Increasingly Canadians are looking for dishes that are not only good to their taste buds but also good for their health Salt is an important nutrient and essential to our diet but Canadians are consuming too much of it In fact Canadians consume more than 3 500 mg of sodium the main ingredient in salt each day This number should be closer to between 1 500 2 300 milligrams of sodium a day which is about one teaspoon of salt Too much sodium increases the risk for high blood pressure hypertension and it has been estimated that high levels of sodium consumption are responsible for one million hypertension cases per year In all about five million Canadian adults have hypertension which is the number one risk factor for stroke and a major risk factor for heart disease Most of the salt that Canadians eat almost 80 per cent comes from packaged foods and the meals they buy when dining out Only about 10 per cent of the sodium Canadians consume comes from the salt shaker on the table and the remaining amount is naturally occurring in foods Canadians love to eat out and they want menu choices that are both delicious and nutritious Restaurants have an important role to play in delivering on both of these fronts Here are some tips for restaurants to help their customers cut back on salt Offer nutrition information for all menu items to allow consumers to make informed healthy choices Leave the salt shaker off the tables and offer fresh ground pepper and other spice options when meals are served Make broth sauces and gravy from scratch and if adding salt limit the amount Use fresh or dried herbs spices flavoured vinegars or

    Original URL path: http://restaurantcentral.ca/Cutbackonsalt.aspx (2016-02-14)
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