archive-ca.com » CA » S » SPACING.CA

Total: 247

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Gordon Price, Author at Spacing Vancouver
    in 2003 he received the Plan Canada Award for Article of the Year Land Use and Transportation The View from 56 from the Canadian Institute of Planners Transit Contributing to the Post referendum discussion on Price Tags The results of the referendum should be out sometime in June likely when I will be out of town from June 22 to July 14 Normally I Read More Features Price Points Free Asphalt It cost millions It s yours to be used for free Map here What happens when the pylons come down on Highway 1 where as Read More Features Price Points Nicest Corner in the West End Sure niceness is subjective But there are some objective reasons The Haro and Cardero corner map here is just a Read More Features Price Points What is Vancouver s newest neighbourhood If you haven t been down Second Avenue between Cambie and Burrard recently be prepared for a shock It s another instant Read More Features Price Points Urban Propinquity A summer day a hiker berries in the bush Where is she Here on Habitat Island False Creek in the heart of Vancouver map Read More Features Price Points The Missing Middle Found No news to any Spacing reader that a good part of Los Angeles was built around the electric streetcar The demise of the famous Red Read More Features Price Points L A Transformation You may have missed this With the passage of Measure R November 2008 Los Angeles bought itself a massive expansion of its rapid Read More Features Price Points The L A Boulevard Ready for its Close up Last February just before I left for a study tour of L A I posted this image and asked What is it about that shot taken in the Read More

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/author/gordonprice/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Contributing to the Post-referendum discussion on Price Tags - Spacing Vancouver
    sometime in June likely when I will be out of town from June 22 to July 14 Normally I would just put my blog Price Tags on hold until return but the post referendum period is too important for that I d like to use Price Tags www pricetags wordpress com as the go to forum to discuss some critical questions depending on the outcome If Yes How did the Yes side succeed What should be the first priorities What should happen to the TransLink regardless If No What is the meaning of No What will be the consequences short and long term How do we get to Yes Prior to the results send me a few paragraphs on your predictions and thoughts on the significance of the referendum and what it means for the region I welcome observations on the politics lessons learned personal perspectives or any item that gets the discussion going Send them to me directly at pricetags shaw ca I will select those to post as individual items and invite further response by readers After the results are known I ll be turning off the automatic comments function on Price Tags Readers may still comment on any selected post but they will not be publicly visible I will select those contributions that add something worthwhile to the dialogue and post them as separate items or part of a discussion thread So no flame wars domination by a few endless repetition Just good quality content on a critical issue Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Video Vancouver Understanding the Transit Referendum RELEASE Register and Vote Yes Transportation and Transit Referendum RELEASE Moving Forward Transit Referendum Campaign Transportation Plebiscite no better engagement strategies Tweet More posts by Gordon Price Search Advertisement Spacing

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/02/contributing-post-referendum-discussion-price-tags/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Price Points: Free Asphalt - Spacing Vancouver
    province What happens to intersections like 108th and King George below map here when drivers divert to the Pattullo Bridge to avoid the tolls 108th Avenue and King George Boulvard on the way to Pattullo Bridge The problem is that there s no other choice for drivers If for instance they were able to park at Guildford and then take transit to Surrey City Centre on the light rail line proposed for 104th Avenue easlily connecting to SkyTrain and other rapid transit or BRT lines down King George and the Fraser Highway then they could realistically consider making another choice and avoid the arterial grid But there s no realistic choice to make and there s not likely to be for years to come So billions of dollars later they remain auto captive and still caught in congestion Just not on the Port Mann Bridge and Highway 1 Gordon Price is the Director of The City Program at Simon Fraser University He sat for six terms as City Councillor in Vancouver BC and also served on the Boards of the Greater Vancouver Regional District Metro and TransLink He publishes an electronic magazine and blog on urban issues with a focus on Vancouver called Price Tags www pricetags ca as well as www pricetags wordpress com He has written several extensive essays on Vancouver and transportation issues The Deceptive City Local Politician s Guide to Urban Transportation and in 2003 he received the Plan Canada Award for Article of the Year Land Use and Transportation The View from 56 from the Canadian Institute of Planners Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Tweet More posts by Gordon Price 3 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Joe 3 years ago Cars won t be forced onto Surrey roads as a portion of SFPR will be opened up from 176th exit on Hwy 1 to Bridgeview so that vehicles can get onto Patullo Of course Patullo won t be able to handle the addtional traffic so the people South of Fraser will be lobbying hard to expand that bridge as well The biggest shame of the Port Mann project is not having buses travelling over it to allow park and ride commuters Stephen Rees 3 years ago Just not on the Port Mann Bridge and Highway 1 Not on the Port Mann because it will be tolled and after a while the tolling authority will be adjusting tolls to maximize revenue Heck they are already running ad campaigns to promote its use But there will be congestion on Highway 1 Traffic expands to fill the space available in the absence of road user pricing The highway is still free so trips will be induced as well as diverted And this process continues until at peak period there is no more room and then congestion begins to be seen The marginal road

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2012/07/23/price-points-free-asphalt/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Price Points: Nicest Corner in the West End - Spacing Vancouver
    a row of parking edged by boulevards sufficient for large trees and abundant landscaping with more room for two sidewalks and setbacks filled with grass and shrubs before the walls fences and gardens of the adjacent properties The sidewalks themselves are like extended rooms cement floors two green walls with wooden pillars flowery wainscotting and arched roofs Eclectic architecture on the northwest corner a brick apartment building from the 1920s double hung windows and cluttered balconies big enough for barbeques and close enough for conversation On the northeast four surviving houses comfortably maintained without being overly precious On the southwest and east corners non descript boxes from the 50s and 60s making the mistakes of their times bland design minimal landscaping paved over parking off the lanes And yet the dog on the balcony probably thinks it s just fine thank you very much Just goes to show that good urban design can trump bad architecture especially when the street is part of a much greater whole a bike route a pedestrian corridor to shops and transit a bucolic urban space crafted out of nature asphalt and concrete Nice Around 1973 the blocks West of Denman were the location for the first permanent traffic calming on the west coast Berkeley CA was also trying out something similar as a trial In 1981 the system after much controversy was extended East of Denman not as a scheme to discourage street prostitution but as part of a Local Improvement Project voted on and partly paid for by property taxpayers a cost that has paid for itself countless times over Gordon Price is the Director of The City Program at Simon Fraser University He sat for six terms as City Councillor in Vancouver BC and also served on the Boards of the Greater

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2012/07/16/price-points-nicest-corner-in-the-west-end/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Brent Toderian, Author at Spacing Vancouver
    is frightful A couple of weeks ago Vancouver was hit by a significant at least by our standards and unexpected snowfall For a city more used to Read More Features A New Years Eve Call to Action for Urbanists Hello Spacing readers on this New Years Eve I find myself thinking with my thumbs on my Blackberry as my wife Read More Features 2012 InReview It s Not About The Bike Or Car It s About Better Cities As 2012 comes to a closes and our Spacing Vancouver contributors take a well deserved break we would like to take the opportunity to Read More Walking Does your neighbourhood pass the trick or treat test Halloween is my favourite holiday for many reasons On top of loving to dress up each year a big reason is it s the holiday Read More Features It s Not About The Bike Or Car It s About Better Cities Dunsmuir Bike Lane at Richards Vancouver BC Photo courtesy Paul Krueger This week I watched with concern Canada s largest Read More Spacing Want Families Downtown Design for Them A few months back Toronto s deputy mayor started a political flap stating on the floor of city council that downtown was no Read More Media TODERIAN Discovering the worlds of Twitter and urbanism Last week I had lunch with a friend and fellow urbanist Bob Ransford Lunches with Bob are never boring as we get right into things Read More Features Olympic Cities and Advanced City Making Part 2 Editor s Note This is the second part of a multi part series by Brent Toderian who will be sharing his direct observations on Read More Features Olympic Cities and Advanced City Making Part 1 Editor s Note With the London 2012 Summer Olympics fast approaching

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/author/brenttoderian/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • TODERIAN: Canada needs a federal ministry of cities - Spacing Vancouver
    a new national strategy on transportation both within and between cities could finally be born A place where a true visionary approach to national urban housing long overdue could be re built A place where everything from smart taxes urban mobility and infrastructure deficits to urban sprawl better suburbs and inner city transformations could be better understood and debated I ve been told I m giving the federal government too much credit could such a department really be a thought leader in our national city building I ve heard fears of centralization and expansion at the very level of government that understands cities least I share those fears I ve also been frequently told the current government doesn t have an interest in cities and that s unlikely to change But the truth is the federal government already has centralized power over cities in mechanisms that matter and the money cities need And whether any particular government or party agrees with the need it s critical for ALL parties to begin discussing better ways to position our cities before future party platforms are established and elections are called The biggest reason the 1970s version of the Ministry of Urban Affairs failed was that it slipped into issues of provincial interest To avoid repeating this error the 2 0 version of a ministry of cities can t be about centralization or the feds taking on more It would have to be about better organization and focus of the federal role and how Canada can help and support our cities better through mechanisms within its power Better partnerships communication and respect more predictable approaches strategic use of federal powers such as taxing and funding and policy leadership that s about the big national picture not stepping on the province s toes Impossible Not for the right person This will be a tougher discussion here in Canada than in the US because unlike America our cities are weak both legally and financially We don t have the funding tools American cities have our mayors have much weaker powers and our cities are legally creatures of the province with no real status in Canadian law Perhaps the ministry of cities will be a place where these two big weaknesses can be discussed Despite them our cities have managed to build themselves in a way that is often the envy of the world Successful livable increasingly green cities that work Just imagine what we could do if our cities were well positioned In the US Florida s suggestion might have been framed as lefty but here in Canada we re smart enough to know that this isn t about left or right it s about success or failure So whether or not the US acts on Florida s advice lets have this much needed discussion here in Canada Lets get all federal parties and provinces talking about this in a non partisan way It s the urban century and our cities and city regions face

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2013/02/14/toderian-canada-needs-a-federal-ministry-of-cities/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Walkable winter cities when the weather is frightful! - Spacing Vancouver
    Toronto s underground PATH system and Montréal s Place Bonaventure subterranean network Such systems can seem hard to resist when cold weather hits and in a way can assist walkability by providing a warm if often indirect and confusing pedestrian opportunity in winter Many cities though now understand they also have harmful effects on the street life below and above them year round After virtually turning their back on their streets because of the cold thankfully many such cities are putting their attention and energy back to lively walking environments at street level Much of the media s winter attention tends to focus on snowmageddon driving conditions and snow clearance budgets This year there was a small media and politician fueled controversy around how fast Vancouver s separated bike lanes were cleared of snow Perhaps this is understandable in the early years of our separated bike lanes but mature winter biking cities like Copenhagen and Amsterdam know that if you want year round urban biking to be an inviting option bike lane snow clearance has to be a priority And urban biking like transit is just an extension of walking with every trip starting and ending with your feet In the broader sense big snowfalls can illustrate how especially vulnerable car dependent cities and suburbs are to disruptive weather patterns Is everything you need widely separated home job shopping your kids activities with driving the only option If so snowstorms can really make life difficult or even miserable Compact complete walkable transit friendly cities on the other hand might feel the effects of snowstorms with disruptions to transit especially where it shares the roads with cars but they tend to be more resilient with things a closer together and more options on how to get around On the day of Vancouver s big snowfall last week for example my chores by foot and transit were delightful if a bit damp For those in their vehicles though the experience was very different whether they had snow tires or not Our recent snowfall illustrated is that even Vancouver not really a winter city in the common use of that title needs to think more about our ability to handle tougher winter conditions With the weather being less predictable and frequency and intensity of storm events getting worse with the consequences of climate change anticipating and designing for unusual weather conditions is going to be the new normal for all of us But enough about the challenges of winter cities Although it s looking gloomy out there today and the chances of a white Christmas are slim there s a brightness that comes from the Holidays that we can always look forward to The Bay s holiday animated window displays in downtown Toronto Photo courtesy of Brent Toderian The holiday season can be wonderful for a walking city With lights banners animated window displays winter themed art and festivals put on by business associations streets can come alive and animate the city It

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2013/01/07/walkable-winter-cities-when-the-weather-is-frightful/ (2015-11-15)
    Open archived version from archive