archive-ca.com » CA » S » SPACING.CA

Total: 989

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • This Is Edmonton: Whyte At Night (Part 2) - Spacing Edmonton
    street functions as a true main street for the Strathcona neighbourhood busy with local workers grabbing a coffee before heading to the office shoppers perusing the bookstores and boutiques errand runners popping into the bank and exercisers joining their classes at the yoga studios After work people heading home picking up their kids from school or heading for an after work bite fill the sidewalks as they wind down from their days Once the sun dips below the horizon however the street starts to take on a different kind of energy The bars fill up the average age dips to 20 or so and the blood alcohol level rises On summer weekends in particular the police set up shop to moderate the worst excesses of youthful exuberance a legacy of the infamous 2001 Canada Day riot and the unrestrained excitement during the 2006 Oilers cup run After each night of raucous partying the shops and restaurants open up again the next day and shoppers diners and families come back to enjoy this truly urban avenue Almost as if none of the previous night s activities even happened The following is the second of a two part series on the dual nature of Whyte Avenue by Edmonton photographers Owen Murray and Tom Young Part 1 Sun on Whyte was posted on this blog on Wednesday All images Tom Young 2012 and 2013 Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts What will Alberta s provincial election mean for its cities Why are Jasper and Whyte Ave 7 Lanes Wide This Is Edmonton Park ing Day 2015 Edmonton Today Has Spring Sprung Tweet More posts by Tom Young 3 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2013/11/15/edmonton-whyte-night-part-2/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive


  • The spacingTime Continuum - Inaugural Whyte Ave Edition - Spacing Edmonton
    This Is Edmonton Park ing Day 2015 Tweet More posts by Kurt Borth 10 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Stephanie M 3 years ago Neat compilation of photos throughout time Kurt The outdoor seating at the Redford Inn looks like a great addition to the street although I wonder if it would have been noisy from the traffic passing by Was it easier to include outdoor seating patios more easily in the 1990s compared to today Kurt Borth 3 years ago Thanks Stephanie I think there weren t as many places that needed outdoor seating before the big shift to more restaurants cafe s and bars on Whyte but I m sure patio seating was an issue then as well I was inside the People s Pub a few times but I don t think I ever sat on the patio Maybe some readers could comment on your question Tom Young 3 years ago Love this comparison I ll be watching for these posts whenever you do them Time travel indeed I didn t know about the Raymond Hotel The guidelines the City uses to approve or deny patio applications haven t changed since the 80s I don t think maybe time for a rewrite One challenge is creating a practical patio while maintaining enough sidewalk space restaurants or bars like to have enough space to move around the tables and the City needs to maintain at least 2 m of walking width so achieving both can be difficult even on Whyte where the sidewalks are wider than they are on most streets The other big challenge is providing adequate parking Even though patios are seasonal the City expects parking to be provided for them on site Parking reduction variances can be requested but it s a lot of hoops to jump through and can give your neighbours cause to appeal the decision The parking issue is probably the biggest impediment but no one has championed a change to the regulations yet Spoonman 3 years ago I LOVE what you are doing here I ve been hanging out on Whyte since I could take the bus back in jr high in the mid 80 s I ve been scouring the net for older pics of whyte and am glad I found your page I keep hoping to find more from the 80 s but no luck yet I ll be coming back to see what else you come up with keep up the great work Kurt Michelle 3 years ago What a great compilation I m reminded of how young we are as a city and totally enjoyed the then and now I too loved the look and practicality of the street car Elise Shillington 3 years ago Awesome compilation Kurt Really enjoyed it Gregory Wilson 3 years ago Nice study Kurt It intrigues me also how photographs of the

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2013/04/08/past-spaces-new-places/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • This is Edmonton: Chinatown South - Spacing Edmonton
    to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown much in favour of the City s crafted name of Quarters Despite its empty appearance there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan According to one planner I have been told the reason for this omission is that there is already a Chinatown to the north Does that mean that Edmonton is only limited to one defined Chinatown Obviously not but must landscapes influenced by specific cultures be confined to one or few places This is an important discussion city builders need to think about if we are trying to champion multiculturalism in Canada Still others have told me that these local stories are just sweet memories stuck in the past and will prevent future opportunities for renewal not to be confused with redevelopment However is this an ethical approach to planning for neighbourhoods Are we telling developers and future residents that it is okay to develop in the Quarters because Chinatown is no longer there Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape Although the Quarters plan does not intentionally ignore certain segments of the existing community and there are active discussions between residents with the City the omission and exclusionary nature in its marketing messaging and common language does set the overall tone Despite its failings I still love and frequent this area Fortunately there are significant community groups that are continuing discussions on such issues and advocating for more inclusion during the renewal process Not to be confused with NIMBY notions these groups including the Chinese community need to be open and welcoming to new arts groups businesses and development that are desperately needed for the area Likewise local improvements should recognize past memories both good and bad without rewriting i e tokenism or replacing them All photographs by photographer Yumi Imai A lion statue in front of Harbin Gate on the western edge of Chinatown South A ball shaped tongue can be moved inside the mouth for good luck An old restaurant sign advertising the underground Pearl City restaurant along 97 Street Painted signage on the side of the building currently occupied by Chinese tenants Fading signage looking towards downtown Closeby is the Double Greeting Wonton House Peering in the windows of Grierson Centre a minimal security institutional centre and federal heritage site Another shot of the Grierson Centre Abandoned housing along Jasper Avenue As a child I was told that I would end up living here if I misbehaved A few brick buildings dot the neighbourhood representing a past era of Edmonton s original downtown core Like the iconic Gibson Block building some buildings will need restoration and care

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2013/12/18/edmonton-chinatown-south/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive



  • Late Night Transit Service: Essential for City's Ambitious Goals - Spacing Edmonton
    have a population of over 1 3 million which has led to a city that works and enjoys entertainment options around the clock Those with livelihoods dependent on shift work will certainly benefit from such service according to such advocates they are often financially unable to afford a car or to pay exorbitant cab fares to get to and from work Another group that stands to benefit are those enjoying our city s burgeoning nightlife until now they have had no other option but to factor in extra dollars to the cost of their evening by taking taxis home assuming of course that they can even find one on Jasper Ave 124 th Street or on Whyte Ave for which competition can become fierce after midnight However in spite of the obvious benefit to these two populations it might be hard for the average Edmontonian to see why late night transit service is a necessity After all most of us are snug in our beds at night not out at 3 00 am Ultimately building Edmonton into a truly livable urban centre will be difficult if not impossible unless public transportation can compete with the private car at all times of the day For example suppose that someone is deciding whether to take ETS or drive to a show at the Citadel Theatre As things currently stand they are more likely to choose the latter option as it will allow them to go for a post show meal or drink without worrying about being stranded downtown after 12 30 am The added comfort of knowing that transit service would be available to them and the convenience of not having to search for parking pay for a cab or forgo that drink are factors that are likely to influence auto travellers to choose transit for certain trips Comfort and convenience would represent a form of travel time cost reduction if we were able to put a dollar value to these factors Unfortunately transit agencies typically only assign quantitative measurements such as operating costs to assess their operations This represents a missed opportunity to improve the ride experience of passengers of which available comprehensive night service beyond the scope of the initial pilot is an important part In addition to attracting choice riders a full 24 hour transit network would introduce a measure of social justice for the industrial and shift employees that make up a large proportion of Edmonton s workforce These fields of employment often do not offer a living wage making car ownership or cab rides prohibitively expensive Allowing these employees to access their places of work via transit works to enhance the City s equity goals in addition to improving the transit mode share With a comprehensive grid of 24 hour buses that goes beyond this September s pilot Edmonton citizens would be able to use ETS services for far more than just getting to work Instead transit could become the preferred mode for those working non traditional

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2015/09/23/late-night-transit-service-essential-citys-ambitious-goals/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Trent Portigal, Author at Spacing Edmonton
    shows governments moving in an uncoordinated and contradictory way toward Read More Community Schools and Parks I A History of Sharing Developing schools and parks involves complex issues of land acquisition ownership and mixing of uses The history of provincial Read More History A Tramway to Somewhere The story of Edmonton s rail transit begins in 1893 a year after the Town of Edmonton was incorporated A paragraph is usually enough Read More Parks A Pocket Park Paradise An article entitled City closer to changing downtown Edmonton parking lot putting up paradise appeared in Metro News last year Read More History Selling Subdivisions to Francophones Part 2 The period of 1905 to 1915 was an eventful time for Edmonton and up until the 1912 annexation Strathcona The French language Read More History Selling Subdivisions to Francophones Part 1 For a short time about a century ago Edmonton was the home to the only French language newspaper in western Canada The paper a Read More Curiosities A Partial History of A Roadway Plan 524R An odd shaped lot about twelve hundred square metres in size and located just north of 76 Avenue in Mill Creek Ravine South was Read More Search

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/author/portigal/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Spacing Edmonton Contributors - Spacing Edmonton
    Communication Community Culture Curiosities Events Features Film Video Food Green Space Headlines History Housing Infrastructure Maps Media Neighbourhoods Parks Photos Politics Services Spacing Streetscape Traffic Transit Urban Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic Spacing Edmonton Contributors Adam Bentley Chelsea Boos David Cooper Derek Robinson Erik Backstrom Greg Whistance Smith Jane Purvis Jason Pfeifer Jeff Robson Jennifer Laforest Joshua Kupsch Kathryn Gwun Yeen Lennon Keegan Brooks Kurt Borth Kyle Witiw Lana Cuthbertson Marcelo Figueira Matt Kleywegt Matthew Dance Olivia Fung Owen Murray Paul Giang Paul Swanson Peter Marriott Peter West Rachelle Bugeaud sam singh scott varga Stephanie Mah The Yards Tim Querengesser Tom Young Trent Portigal Tyson Christensen Vincent Puhakka Zoe Todd Spacing is always looking for new ideas and welcomes queries and pitches from writers for both our magazine and website Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The Scale of Two Cities Schools and Parks I A History of Sharing This Is Edmonton Whyte At Night Part 2 Induced Demand How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment The spacingTime Continuum Inaugural Whyte Ave Edition From the Spacing Store 22 Buy yourself a subscription 22 Buy a renewal subscription 22 Buy a gift subscription

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/authors/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Debunking Edmonton's "War on Cars" - Spacing Edmonton
    some neighbourhoods a more expensive and time consuming process Substantial investments in reconstruction and maintenance are being made now rising steadily since 2006 But with over 300 neighbourhoods in Edmonton it will take time to catch up In the meantime Edmontonians might benefit from a bit of perspective When prices per kilometre are quoted for cycling investments it is worth asking about the equivalent cost of roadway infrastructure The 2015 2018 Capital Budget provided 4 3 million for the 3 kilometre 83 Avenue Bikeway parallel to Whyte Avenue a per km cost of 1 4 million This is a significant budget for a cycling project and will create protected bike lanes a type of infrastructure never built before in Edmonton Less complex cycling infrastructure such as thermoplastic reflective lanes can be built for substantially less and are appropriate in cycling corridors anticipated to see less use than the already busy Strathcona Garneau area By comparison the 3 5 kilometre 33 3 million widening of Whitemud Drive between 66 and 34 Streets works out to a per km cost of 9 5 million This is seven times as costly as what will be Edmonton s classiest cycling infrastructure Will more than seven times as many drivers use the new lanes of Whitemud as cyclists on the new bikeway Probably But the entire four year capital budget for all active transportation projects in Edmonton is equivalent to this single freeway widening project With such a tiny proportion of dollars going to active transportation is it really worth getting our seat belts in a twist over Tom Young is an urban planner and editor for Spacing Edmonton Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts What will Alberta s provincial election mean for its cities Late Night Transit Service Essential for City s Ambitious Goals Look Both Ways Crosswalk design vs data Bike Collisions in Edmonton Tweet More posts by Tom Young 5 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Conrad Nobert 7 months ago Great piece It s also worth noting that the money for the 83 Avenue Bike Route will also rebuild the car right of way and parking lane on the road So even when we re spending money on bikes we re still spending it on cars Adam Roy 7 months ago Good piece team Dan Sabo 7 months ago Great article Erik Backstrom 7 months ago Good article Tom The funding for pedestrian and bike infrastructure is really quite modest considering the more sustainable future to which we aspire Robert 5 months ago People are not using the cycle routes yet mainly because they have little to no feeling of safety regardless of how few people have been injured or killed on them Would anyone but the cycling fanatics want to cycle next to fast moving cars even on a narrow bike lane I say on

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2015/04/20/debunking-edmontons-war-cars/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Opinion: Entrance sign debate needs refocus - Spacing Edmonton
    underwhelming I believe that they are arguably better than Calgary s pixelated hat slapped on a highway sign But that s not really the point frankly I think the entrance signs should not be the focus of this debate Hello Calgary For anybody driving into Edmonton the time spent looking at the city entrance signs would be at most two seconds The approximate time spent looking at the roadscape along Gateway Boulevard on the other hand is 25 minutes And what a depressing drive that is Notable features include awful landscaping South Edmonton Common cheesy decorative poles and a proliferation of junky billboards and portable signs There is a glimpse of urban vibrancy once you stop at Whyte Avenue But that sanity lasts briefly only to be confronted after by a car dealership an underutilized End of Steel Park with no adjacent sidewalks to boot and fast traffic roads that would deter most pedestrians Decorative poles and signs along Gateway Boulevard Lack of sidewalks and vibrant streets along Gateway Boulevard in Old Strathcona Surely if we wanted to instill a good first impression of Edmonton for visitors and residents in hopes that they will stay or come back would we not be better off focusing on improving the streetscape of Gateway Boulevard rather than a solitary landmark Alternative scenario Thankfully the trip heading downtown is not so bad for those taking transit from the airport Considering the Albertan habit of annexing lands the entrance sign would need to be highly mobile to reflect constant boundary changes Perhaps we could attach Gene Dub s proposed entrance pyramid to the LRT once it reaches Edmonton International Rendering by Tom Young Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts This Is Edmonton Park ing Day 2015 Why are Jasper

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/10/09/entrance-sign/ (2015-11-16)
    Open archived version from archive