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  • Shawn Micallef, Author at Spacing National
    of six million people and more coming We need your help Read More Transit International Transport Forum geographic data visualizing of San Francisco s private bus networks EDITOR S NOTE Spacing senior editor Shawn Micallef is in Germany this week attending the International Transport Forum He ll report Read More Transit International Transport Forum Road Safety Report what about a rating system for road safety EDITOR S NOTE Spacing senior editor Shawn Micallef is in Germany this week attending the International Transport Forum Read More Transit Two of the greatest Canadian railway resources you ll explore for many hours Two weeks ago I wrote my Toronto Star column on how Toronto was shaped by the railways as is the case with many Canadian cities and Read More Architecture Shawn Micallef on the state of Canadian modernism It wasn t until the 1950s that Canadian urban regions had the economic might to build modern cities And what an intriguing legacy Read More Neighbourhoods Regent Park a new report tells the story of how Toronto s 1 billion public housing revitalization happened Last year I was asked by the Metcalf Foundation if I d be interested in writing a Collective Impact report

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/national/author/shawn-micallef/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Waterfront Archives | Page 2 of 2 | Spacing
    30 PM 2 00 PM WHERE Room 1700 Labatt Hall Harbour Read More Toronto REMINDER Waterfront T Shirt Design Contest closes on Wednesday By Spacing WHAT Spacing Store presents Iconic Waterfront T Shirt Design Contest DEADLINE Wednesday May 27th COST Free PRIZES 750 for each Read More Reclaiming Spaces Places Revealing a forgotten Indigenous visual narrative in Peterborough By Lacey Mcrae Williams Reclaiming Spaces Places is an ongoing series written by Lacey McRae Williams that shares stories of Indigenous resurgence through Read More Going Wild in Vancouver By Yuri Artibise I recently met up with David Miller the President CEO of WWF Canada the Canadian division of the international World Wildlife Read More Ottawa Image of the Past The Rideau River from Billings Bridge early 1900s By Spacing Image Rideau River from Billings Bridge Ottawa Ont Location Billings Bridge Ottawa Canada Date of photo 1900 1910 Read More Post navigation Newer posts Our complete archives are available via our city blogs Waterfront Archives Spacing Toronto Waterfront Archives Spacing Montreal Waterfront Archives Spacing Vancouver Waterfront Archives Spacing Ottawa Waterfront Archives Spacing Atlantic Waterfront Archives Spacing Edmonton Waterfront Archives Spacing Calgary Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/waterfront/page/2/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Food Archives - Spacing Atlantic
    Region Topic Food Chickens in the city America s urban farming innovations By Jonathan Zettel In America several key innovations are making urban farming a sustainable method of food production Rooftops window sills and Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts From the Vaults Gottingen Street Stadium Dreams at Shannon Park Urban Development Does Halifax need to grow up From the

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/food/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Small is Beautiful: Dartmouth's Findlay Centre and the new Master Plan - Spacing Atlantic
    that the Findlay will once again face the chopping block Apples and Oranges Consolidating the Findlay and the Sportsplex as proposed in 2014 doesn t make sense because the two serve very different purposes Apart from the fitness centres which are very different in nature in the two facilities there is little overlap The Sportsplex is primarily focussed on regional level recreation while the Findlay offers a wide variety of smaller scale activities It s not simply a matter of absorbing one into the other Would the Sportsplex inspire the neighbourhood to create an outdoor movie screen Would the Sportsplex have room for the horseshoe club Would the Sportsplex provide a pre school a senior s club a community garden a gym that young people can drop into for unstructured activities a pottery studio and affordable meeting space Would groups like the Heart and Soul running club move up the hill Would seniors from the five retirement homes that are just blocks away from the Findlay make the walk uphill through the Common or would that extra distance become a barrier Some of the Findlay s activities might fit in a newly renovated Sportsplex and adapt to a new location and new cost structure but some would likely end up elsewhere or cease to exist altogether The consultation on the Sportsplex modernization noted that many new users feel intimidated about using the facility due to its size and that there is a perception that the Sportsplex is only for more professional athletes or people with money It s commendable that the vision for the modernized Sportsplex involves breaking down these views and building stronger connections to the community but this shouldn t come at the Findlay s expense In fact as the spoke the Findlay likely helps break down these barriers by introducing people to the programs provided by the municipality in a less intimidating setting The Findlay is built at a friendly human scale and is enmeshed in its neighbourhood Instead of trying to make the Sportsplex into some kind of large Findlay Centre with a regional rink and pool attached why not allow each facility to focus on what it does best The two should complement each other as the 2008 CFMP s hub and spoke model envisioned HRM has set a goal of increasing the population living in the Regional Centre where existing services are already available The Regional Centre includes Downtown Dartmouth which could see significant residential development in the years ahead at King s Wharf Dartmouth Cove and other infill sites If the Regional Centre is going to accommodate more people the corresponding services need to be in place services like those offered at the Findlay The Findlay Closure 2 0 Given the earlier staff recommendation and the general trend of governments at all levels to consolidate small facilities there is a real risk that closing the Findlay will reappear as a recommendation in the 2016 Community Facilities Master Plan Public consultation for the revised

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2015/09/29/small-beautiful-dartmouths-findlay-centre-new-master-plan/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Toronto flirts with participatory budgeting - Spacing Toronto
    The Toronto experiment In Toronto the City Manager s Office moved to pilot this approach using existing staff resources after City Council approved the plan last February Throughout the summer city staff hosted dozens of meetings to inform residents about the cost implications of each project and the potential benefits for their neighbourhood A list of resident selected projects is now available on the city s website Anyone 14 years or over and who lives in the pilot areas may apply through the city website to vote on participatory budgeting projects In the past two weeks Oakridge neighbours decided to fund lighting water fountains and bench improvements in two of its parks Over 400 residents voted in Ward 33 for a Don Valley Fitness Park bike lockers near Don Mills Subway Station and the Brian Village Gateway Project Councillor Frank Di Giorgio s office meanwhile considered the Rustic pilot a great success with more people coming out to vote than showed up to for the consultations A third party consultant is studying all three PB pilots and will report to City Council when it revisits the experiment in November Toronto has looked at variations of participatory budgeting before In 2004 then Mayor David Miller introduced Listening to Toronto public consultations to inform residents about the budgeting process and hear their views But the initiative lasted just two years and did not enable participants to actually make budget decisions Yet Toronto Community Housing has a long track record with this kind of decision making offering tenants the opportunity to vote on improvement projects since 2001 This year TCHC allotted a whopping 8 million for tenants to decide on improvements to public safety laundry facilities and playgrounds A few individual councillors have also pursued their own projects Last year Councillor Shelley Carroll Don Valley East used a variation of participatory budgeting to help allocate community development funds in her ward She believes that this idea is a panacea for Toronto s age of disgruntlement Mayor John Tory agrees saying the pilot is a thoughtful and direct way for residents to tell City Hall what matters to them In a quote submitted by email Mayor Tory advised Spacing that participatory budgeting will lead to residents getting more involved in their community and working together to create a better Toronto Besides such high minded goals participatory budgeting may help re elect politicians who adopt the practice according to Paolo Spada Democracy Fellow for the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions at University of British Columbia But he cautions there are no commonly accepted metrics for evaluating how well participatory budgeting works He says it is initially difficult to measure whether this technique is merely window dressing or meaningfully transforms the process by which budget decisions are made Spada believes that genuine participatory budgeting is very successful at engaging residents to discuss and decide matters of local importance but that people generally won t turn up if their participation doesn t lead to anything

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/09/28/toronto-flirts-participatory-budgeting/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Alexandra Flynn, Author at Spacing Toronto
    Alexandra Flynn Civic Engagement Toronto flirts with participatory budgeting This fall Toronto residents not bureaucrats or politicians will decide if the city adds benches along Danforth Avenue lighting Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s Guide to Toronto Events Nov 15 21 Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter LORINC How

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/alexandraflynn/ (2015-11-16)
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  • SUMMER OF THE GUN: 10 years later, conclusion - Spacing Toronto
    student was killed with a gun at a Toronto school the Eaton Centre shoot out and the Danzig Street attacks during the summer of 2012 one of the worst mass crimes in Toronto history Moving from crime prevention to community well being The good news is that our leaders finally seem to be coming to understand that the more we focus on crime prevention and law enforcement the more we will be relying on the police to ensure community safety Instead we should be developing a holistic community well being strategy to achieve improved neighbourhood safety DeRay McKesson an American civil rights activist put it succinctly Community safety is not predicated on police presence but on economic stability workforce development strong schools and healthy neighborhoods How to get there First Queen s Park should halt the permanent funding of TAVIS until there s a comprehensive independent analysis of whether these investments justified the expense Since its inception in 2006 according to the Ministry of Community Safety Correctional Services 2013 report TAVIS has led to 24 031 arrests and made 474 346 community contacts But how can carding almost half a million people to produce 24 031 arrests a significant number of which didn t lead to criminal convictions be deemed success Do the means justify the ends Is this strategy making Ontarians safer or is it alienating large portions of the city s population Instead of spending 5 million on TAVIS every year the provincial government should dedicate additional funding to reintegration programs for young offenders Youth between the ages of 20 and 25 are at the highest risk of being a victim or perpetrator of gun violence but there aren t enough programs designed specifically for a vulnerable demographic whose members could use more attention We should also question the prevailing assumption that the police should have a monopoly on countering or preventing violent behaviour It s like the old saying if your only tool is a hammer every problem looks like a nail With the experience gleaned from the past ten years in fact we desperately need to look for other tools Consider the Breaking the Cycle program In recent years 250 young ex gang members have become community ambassadors who can use their street knowledge to head off conflicts before they turn violent Similar programs operate elsewhere with impressive results But as long as the city regards the police as the only institution mandated to fight youth violence we will never tap into alternative approaches that engage young people with intimate knowledge of the dynamics that lead to conflict It s worth noting that other jurisdictions have had precisely these kinds of insights Historically in Canada according to a 2008 B C report on preventing youth violence by sociologist and gang expert Mark Totten gang suppression and community safety strategies have won out over evidence based treatment and prevention Unfortunately scarce resources have been spent on get tough approaches where young gang members are incarcerated at huge

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/08/04/summer-gun-10-years-later-conclusion/ (2015-11-16)
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  • SUMMER OF THE GUN: 10 years later, pt. II - Spacing Toronto
    life in high needs neighbourhoods When it launched the Youth Action Plan the province said TAVIS s activities had resulted in 21 748 arrests and 1 991 firearms seizures as of December 31 2011 At the same time police officials say the success of TAVIS is measured not based on the number of arrests made but on the reduction in crime enhancement of public trust and confidence and the building of relationships within the communities most affected by violence Now I don t know how the police quantify public trust and confidence but in the eyes of many residents of neighbourhoods directly affected by their tactics TAVIS is seen as one of the worst elements of Toronto s policing especially among those most directly impacted racialized youth As an intervention strategy TAVIS was designed to be time limited geographically specific and issue based It s supposed to be intelligent led policing which targets known gang associates engaged in guns and drug activities who are on the verge of committing an offence not the mass documentation of ordinary people whose only misfortune is that they happen to live in a crime hot spot But in the way SWOT teams evolved from an emergency response into full time units the TAVIS strategy became standard operating practice even though its track record has never been formally assessed Common sense dictates that no operational plan should last forever especially when violent crime rates have been decreasing across the board Yet governments have consistently failed to evaluate the impact of aggressive policing strategies As the 2008 Roots of Youth Violence report observed They may for example bring dangerous criminals to justice deter crime reduce fear of crime in specific communities and increase public trust in the police However previous research suggests that these aggressive policing programs may also be expensive may not reduce crime rates in the long term and could have a very negative impact on community perceptions of the justice system The only way to truly determine the long term benefits and consequences of such programs would be to conduct rigorous transparent evaluations What is the relationship between stops arrests and convictions for TAVIS Right now that information is not publicly available Consequently we can t determine whether TAVIS high contact rates with targeted communities translate into significant quantities of guns being taken off the streets While it is easy to round up people and lay charges TAVIS s true success should be based on the conviction rate which has never been publicly revealed Similarly raids became common annual occurrences in many low income neighbourhoods But could these guns and gang sweeps have unwittingly contributed to increased violence According to researchers the answer is yes Raids tend to create a power vacuum When police arrest the senior leaders of a gang younger more junior members take their place As a result this messy power shift produces more chaos One 2010 University of Toronto research thesis by Amy Marie Siciliano pinpointed a 2004 raid

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/07/30/summer-gun-ten-years-later-part-2/ (2015-11-16)
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