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  • Idil Burale, Author at Spacing Toronto
    Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic By Idil Burale Politics SUMMER OF THE GUN 10 years later pt II The response to the summer of the gun has been characterized as a combination of prevention i e place based investment and Read More Politics BURALE Why are we so reluctant to truly end carding In Toronto it is now in vogue to be down with the cause that is Stop Carding Now The media is on board so are some prominent Read More Services BURALE What we don t talk about when we talk about carding This week Toronto Police Board TPSB chair Alok Mukherjee broke his silence and admitted to The Toronto Star that he was cornered Read More Neighbourhoods BURALE We need to reframe how we talk about our city Toronto Life this month is running a cover profile about the inner suburbs The article sought to expose the divisions within our Read More Community BURALE The reality of fighting poverty If cities had New Year s resolutions Toronto s should be a poverty reduction strategy According to the new report on child poverty Read More Politics BURALE Tory needs to repair trust between police and community Mayor John Tory said he wanted to improve the relationship between the Toronto Police Service TPS and the community and signaled Read More Politics BURALE Ford Nation is not dead Idil Burale is a new contributor to Spacing and recently ran in ward 1 for city councillor On October 27th Torontonians much to the Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s Guide to Toronto Events Nov 15 21 Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter LORINC How to invest with Crosstown s found

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/idilburale/ (2015-11-16)
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  • SUMMER OF THE GUN, 10 years later: Part I - Spacing Toronto
    on this way There has to be a time when we all come together and solve these problems The eruption of seemingly random public violence gave then mayoral candidate John Tory a big boost and gave credence to his pledge to hire 400 additional police officers David Miller then in a lead that was rapidly narrowing had no choice but to match Tory s promise The pressure on Miller to adopt a tough on crime stance not only continued after his victory but intensified In response Miller with backing from then Ontario chief justice Roy McMurtry launched a community safety plan that set out to strengthen the social infrastructure of priority neighbourhoods with high levels of crime and poverty By late 2005 after the headline making gun violence of the summer and then a job action by front line officers the Toronto Police Services Board consummated a new contract that included cash for up to 200 new beat cops The Ontario Liberal government meanwhile established the guns and gangs taskforce a multi agency GTA wide effort that included funds for more investigators and 32 new crowns But if the summer violence put guns on the front policy burner the political turning point occurred on Boxing Day 2005 when Jane Creba a teenager out shopping on Yonge Street died during a hail of crossfire near the Eaton s Centre Within days of the tragic death of a young innocent bystander Toronto police and the province announced the creation of the Toronto Anti Violence Intervention Strategy a 51 million program that added even more specialized prosecutors established a major crime courtroom and funded the construction of a 26 million state of the art operations centre for the guns and gangs taskforce Children and innocent bystanders had died in earlier incidents in the suburbs or public housing but Creba s death on a crowded downtown street became a rallying point and provided police with a license to crack down on gangs in the neighbourhoods considered by police to be the prime source of all the violence Perhaps because of the increased enforcement or perhaps due to other factors the city s homicide rate in 2006 dropped towards more historically typical levels but it bounced right back in the first several months of 2007 Then on the weekend following Victoria Day Jordan Manners also 15 was shot and killed in a stairwell of C W Jefferys Collegiate a North York high school Manners death caused a firestorm of outrage comparable to the aftermath of Creba s death at least in part because no student had ever been shot to death inside a Toronto school Stories circulated about outsiders including gang members wandering freely inside the hallways of C W Jefferys Two weeks after Manners death the Toronto District School Board decided to conduct a far ranging investigation appointing criminal lawyer Julian Falconer to lead a panel that would examine safety issues across the entire board A few days later then premier Dalton McGuinty named

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/07/29/summer-gun-10-years-later-pt/ (2015-11-16)
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  • UrbSanity: Shhh!!! A loud vision for the Central Library - Spacing Ottawa
    author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Mike Pyndus 5 months ago Remember that the Central Branch does not serve the entire City there are 33 local branches that do that Ottawa Public Library Facilities Investment and Growth Planning Study December 8 2010 states 30 000 square feet of the Main Library at 120 Metcalfe was allocated to the District D library function of the Central District with the remainder allocated to the Central C library function For comparison purposes below are some sample branches showing their 2006 Population in their Catchment Areas and the branch size Main Branch Catchment population 27 790 people 30 000 sq ft Beaverbrook Branch Catchment population 30 247 people 10 000 sq ft Hazeldean Branch Catchment population 41 264 people 9 713 sq ft Ruth E Dickinson Branch Catchment population 54 617 people 17 100 sq ft Nepean Centrepointe Branch Catchment population 36 852 people 36 940 sq ft St Laurent Branch Catchment population 43 062 people 13 540 sq ft Cumberland Branch Catchment population 64 358 people 24 500 sq ft If we look at what the Community Ward 14 Somerset needs for its community branch 30 000 square feet should be adequate With that out of the way we can look at the added 102 000 square feet of City wide wishes for large community open spaces banquet facilities a new OPL corporate headquarters an exercise gym and everything else that came out of the dream session If we focus on the community need then the business case would be significantly different because there are a lot more options and lower cost for the smaller branch footprint The City gathering area and tourist attraction could be addressed separately and located anywhere The size of the proposed Central Library still has not been established using a needs approach and a proper analysis OPL keeps referring to the Renovation Report dated 25 June 2014 as the source of the 130 000 square feet In fact a MFIPPA request revealed the report author did not analyse the requirements but was given the space by OPL staff to use A subsequent MFIPPA request for any documents and correspondence used by OPL staff to determine the space requirements revealed that none were prepared or available Furthermore directions to the author of the current report did not request a an analysis of the space requirements but requested in the RFP Recommend optimal functional components and spatial requirements for a maximum 130 000 square foot renewed Main Library Essentially they were told to fill in the 130 000 square foot space I would like to remind you that my analysis at https www facebook com pages Unofficial Ottawa Central Library Discussions789240227823220 ref aymt homepage pane showed only 70 000 square feet is required for the combined community branch element and the City Wide element The 2008 study for a New Central Library arrived at a 345 800 square foot complex that would have cost close to 200 M This went nowhere The OPL appears to have learned from this and is now proposing a space that will keep the bill under 100 M that may be within the tax payer s pain threshold Unfortunately this method of getting as much money as one can and then filling in the space later flies in the face of a real needs analysis Reply Michael 5 months ago This article is so misguided First of all the purpose of a sky s the limit exercise is to get ideas not to implement every idea that has been discussed This is also a forum for ALL people to give their input not just people with urbanist backgrounds This is for the people who are really using the library and what they perceive are the limitations of the current building Second you are against building a new library when we have a perfectly good one right now You have failed to mention that the entire reason the NEW option is preferred is that it was determined that current maintenance costs plus the sheer expense of the building would be astronomical when compared to what you would get out of a new building Plus it was identified that the library needs more space than it currently has Considering its surroundings the only place to go would be to build up which would result in something bizarrely tacked onto the top And most importantly the current design is very poor in terms of accessibility and mobility which the amount of elderly people and those with disabilities who are actually able to get out into the community and into our libraries is constantly increasing Finally just because a new library is made of glass on the outside doesn t mean you can see through it from one end to the other Architects are there for a reason They know there s a requirement for reading nooks and other spaces These will be located behind actual walls inside the building It wont just be floor after floor of spacious emptiness surrounded by windows I agree that the currently preferred location is not ideal but you didn t actually even mention the location Finally it may be an example of a nice brutalist Canadian library but Ottawa already has an even nicer brutalist Canadian library at uOttawa Many cities are rejuvenating and re imagining their tired old libraries because they are worn out thanks to their many users day after day for many years and because a city that proves they are willing to invest big dollars in arts and education is much more attractive than a city that just wants a new coat of paint Reply Sarah 5 months ago Hi Michael Thanks for the comments Both from personal experience and research in the field of public participation the point I m trying to raise is more related to how public consultation is

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/ottawa/2015/06/19/urbsanity-shhh-loud-vision-central-library/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Doors Open Ottawa 2015: A look at Ottawa’s Community Support Services - Spacing Ottawa
    Main Street Listed as Number 27 on the Doors Open Ottawa schedule CNA House provided visitors a new look at the operations of one of our most essential national services The building itself is important as it was designed by Ottawa architect James Strutt in 1966 Strutt was a modernist architect and disciple of architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Buckminster Fuller He is known for having fostered the modernist movement in Ottawa and more largely Canada The CNA House is an essential piece of this modern architectural history and a wonderful building to experience In addition to its importance as an architectural treasure the CNA House also features murals by the official Dominion Sculptor Eleanor Milne These murals coinciding with the four compass directions depict an abstract narrative of the span of nursing practice from birth to death In 2008 the Canadian Nurses Association celebrated their 100th anniversary as an organization At Doors Open Ottawa visitors were given a brief history of the important work this association has done and continues to do for nurses and patients across the country including professional development advocacy scholarships and research This organization provides its members as well as the public with essential services to promote the awareness of nursing practices across Canada and its resources A third essential service that opened its doors to the public for the first time this weekend was the AIDS Committee of Ottawa ACO The organization has served the greater Ottawa community for 30 years providing much needed education and support services to individuals diagnosed with HIV AIDS their families and the public The ACO moved to its new location at 19 Main St in December 2014 from Bank and Cooper and has continued to empower those living with HIV AIDS collaborating with other local organizations and being active members of the community The ACO team continues to be proactive in combatting the stigma of HIV AIDS and fostering an environment of transparency toward the general public The AIDS Committee of Ottawa s recently completed modern and bright facility has played a critical role in creating a new face for the organization Touring the facility it s evident that an emphasis has been placed on communicating the history of the movement through those who understand it best those living with HIV AIDS Their stories line the walls of this building through art photographs and text Executive Director of the ACO Khaled Salam discussed this effort as one of the most important tools in the healing process for those affected by HIV AIDS Storytelling especially through art is an essential tool for aiding the healing process The art also offers an opportunity for the ACO to expose to the larger community the work that they do and the people they help The centre offers people living with HIV AIDS much more than a typical drop in centre with spaces such as The Living Room give individuals a safe and comfortable environment in which to share and support

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/ottawa/2015/06/16/13061/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Spacing, Author at Spacing Ottawa
    design starts before a single line is drawn It begins with the relationship between the client and various stakeholders and Read More Photos Image of the Moment Northern Lights Parliament sound light show Image The original Centre Block facade superimposed onto today s structure and Peace Tower Opening night of Northern Read More Urban Design Keeping the stoke alive The grand opening of Charlie Bowins Skatepark It s been two and a half years in the making but this weekend the new Charlie Bowins Skatepark at McNabb Park officially Read More History Image of the Past Sussex and Wellington 1914 Image Confederation Square showing Chateau Laurier The Rae Building and the Grand Trunk Railway Station Ottawa Ont 8221 Read More Curiosities Urbabbles A Tale of Two Senators As the NCC waits on five proposals for the redevelopment of LeBreton Flats Spacing Ottawa muses over the possible Read More Services Doors Open Ottawa 2015 A look at Ottawa s Community Support Services On June 6 7 2015 the City of Ottawa marked its 14th annual Doors Open Ottawa event a weekend celebrating the City s built heritage Read More Transit Image of the Moment Trillium line signage goes up Image OC Transpo O Train Trillium Line Location Carleton University Ottawa Canada Date of photo May 1 2015 Photographer Kristen Read More Walking Jane s Walk 2015 3 Walks in Ottawa In a winter city like Ottawa spring is a time for awakening and renewal It s also a great time to get out and explore the city on Read More Post navigation Older posts Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts UrbSanity Streetside spots new tactics for public space The history of the Ottawa subway Dreaming in colour The story behind Ottawa s world

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/ottawa/author/editor/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Our Winter of Discontent: Sidewalks and Snow Clearing - Spacing Atlantic
    and freezes to the sidewalk With bobcats bare pavement only emerges if a storm is followed by some warm sunny days Unfortunately there were no thaws this winter and once an extremely solid bedrock like layer of ice was in place things just got worse and worse until many sidewalks were virtually impassable The municipality did manage the heavy snowfall that hit over March break fairly well it was the ice that stumped them The Ridiculous Winter Rainstorm that Later Froze and Broke Halifax Photo CTV Contractors To prevent a repeat of this winter s mess Halifax needs to consider ways to improve service Sidewalks aren t a luxury they re an essential part of the transportation network If the city is going to keep clearing sidewalks equipment standards and importantly timelines are going to have to be looked at and any improvements that focuses on contracting will likely cost more money The Halifax Cycling Coalition is calling on the city to look at investing in plows with brushes that could get down to bare pavement Another idea would be to restructure how contractors are paid Tim Bousquet argues convincingly in the Halifax Examiner that paying contractors through a fixed price for the whole season rather than by storm takes the emphasis off delivering quality service Contractors are paid a set amount regardless of how much or how little it snows creating an incentive to bid low to win the contract hope for mild weather and if confronted with winter conditions do the minimum The city and its contractors are essentially gambling on the weather If instead contractors were paid by the storm the incentive would shift from trying to protect their limited profit to providing great service Halifax would end up carrying the budgetary weather risk but it s worth remembering that ultimately that risk is always with the municipality no matter what contract is in place If a winter is so bad that contractors even after cutting corners can t make a profit they will simply walk away The municipality doesn t have that luxury because streets and sidewalks need to be attended to Since we can t really transfer the weather risk to the private sector we might as well accept it and focus on getting great service People Power Instead of trying to sort out the contracting side Halifax could hand snow clearing on side streets back to the residents and cut taxes This approach is cheap and relatively effective There is simply no way for the municipality and its contractors to match the collective labour of thousands of residents in terms of quality and speed This is especially important given that Halifax s freeze thaw cycles mean that there is often just a few hours before slush turns to solid ice If citizens are going to take up their shovels again the municipality needs to tackle the old problem of consistency We can t go back to the previous situation where sections of sidewalk could

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2015/04/15/winter-discontent-sidewalks-snow-clearing/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Services Archives | Page 2 of 2 | Spacing
    Bikes Cities For People Civic Engagement Communication Community Culture Curiosities Events Features Film Video Food Green Space Headlines History Housing Infrastructure Maps Media Neighbourhoods Parks Photos Politics Services Spacing Spacing Films Streetscape Traffic Transit Urban Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic Services Edmonton BOTTLE SERVICE Why a wet shelter makes sense for downtown homeless By The Yards Originally published in the winter 2014 issue of The Yards Written by Scott McKeen Mental illness is not a crime Not a moral Read More Post navigation Newer posts Our complete archives are available via our city blogs Services Archives Spacing Toronto Services Archives Spacing Montreal Services Archives Spacing Vancouver Services Archives Spacing Ottawa Services Archives Spacing Atlantic Services Archives Spacing Edmonton Services Archives Spacing Calgary Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s Guide to Toronto Events Nov 15 21 Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter LORINC How to invest with Crosstown s found money The story of Jackie Burroughs a Yorkville laundromat and two of the biggest drug addled bands of t From the Spacing Store 22 Buy yourself a subscription 22 Buy a renewal

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/services/page/2/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Schooling Vancouver - Spacing Vancouver
    areas with the highest density of families with children nearby should have the highest school enrollments Because this is not the case when look at the maps clearly other factors are at play Perhaps at the core of the inversion problem is the uneven distribution of wealth in the city that was institutionalized by planners in the zoning regulations decades ago one that married wealthy populations and low density development A piece written here describes those processes in more depth while the graphs below highlight the relationship between specific bylaws created in the 1980s and 90s and population distributions in the line graphs across Vancouver More specifically how wealthy citizens institutionalized low density in their neighbourhoods something that continues today Graphs showing important planning documents and their relationship to the distribution of people and wealth across Vancouver As processes of urban evolution transform through adopting past models the regulations of old have not changed significantly since their inception with similar land use prejudices of the past still holding sway today That most City led densification initiatives target areas outside Vancouver s lowest density neighbourhoods Grandview Woodland Chinatown and Marpole for example makes this point clearly evident As wealthy populations historically have upheld municipalities to a higher standard in most if not all aspects of living schools of the wealthy often had better teachers and more resources a perception true or not that continues today and a dominant reason why East sider s believe that sending students across the city for school will benefit their children One of the main concerns planners and the general public alike should have around the inversion phenomenon is that it is eliminating a natural feedback loop that should instigate change in neighbourhoods that require it In this case that Vancouver s low density areas have effectively lost the capacity to attract and maintain families with children Under natural conditions the discussion around school closures would be focused on the neighbourhoods that do not support this population This in turn should raise concerns and hopefully creative solutions towards mitigating the problem diversifying and increasing more affordable housing options in the area for example This is clearly not happening and it is creating a detrimental feedback system that is weakening the school structure in the neighbourhoods that need it while strengthening those that do not If this pattern is allowed to continue under the extreme case one can foresee a time when children in an even more densely populated East side are forced to go to West side schools since few will be nearby An unsustainable and unhealthy pattern to say the least and one clearly not in line with good planning practices VSB trustee Patti Bacchus could not have said it more directly We know this is a growing city We will be requiring school space in the future Perhaps a more accurate statement is We know the East side of the city is growing They will be requiring an increase in school space in the

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/29/schooling-vancouver/ (2015-11-16)
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