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  • Cartographically Speaking: Where are the kids? – Epilogue - Spacing Vancouver
    densest areas of the city are Vancouver s child free zones the eroding pattern of above average blue neighbourhoods from left to right shows the eastward movement of families with children This phenomenon generally corresponds to the increase in land housing values over the past 18 years as we can see from our house costs graph below that makes more expensive areas on the city s West side less attainable to the average family Vancouver average home costs interest rates and population distribution between 1980 and 2008 For a larger version click here For years people have casually mentioned this situation in passing without any quantifiable evidence Within the context of our assumptions this graphic substantiates those claims and should really raise some red flags to anybody interested in the future of the city After all families with children account for the majority of our population and it seems reasonable to assume based on the pattern here that this demographic will literally get pushed out of city limits if nothing aggressive is done about making Vancouver s built landscape more suitable for these people Based on what we ve seen throughout this series one of the main lessons learned is that continuing the standard type of developments that characterize neighbourhoods around False Creek such as podium towers and high density apartment buildings won t suffice If we intend on adding density and I definitely think we should we have to aggressively ensure that we provide several different models for dense living in terms of cost and domestic space instead of leaning on our typical urban formulas Cramming families with children into tiny condo won t suffice let alone asking them to pay excessive money for it Also given the eastward movement of families with children we have to ensure that those areas that have seen a decline in children over the years do not lose the amenities associated with them The natural tendency is for services and amenities to follow their target demographic Given that finding ways to accommodate families with children is likely to be implemented over a longer term short term incentives to keep services and amenities relatively equally distributed around the city should be given in tandem with the more aggressive strategies Now a quick word on a recent BTA Works report that looked at public school enrollment numbers since 2004 The map is seen here I ve been approached a number of times as a result of this report and that it seems to conflict with the census data provided True enough at first glance it does But there is a lot of unresolved questions once reading into the information Firstly and most importantly no information is given to compare relative values So for example the fact that downtown schools have experienced an increase in enrollment is not surprising given that prior to two decades ago there were no children there at all Consider this in tandem with the fact that the child population downtown has

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/26/cartographically-speaking-kids-epilogue/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Cartographically Speaking: Where are the kids? – 13-18 years - Spacing Vancouver
    of above average neighbourhoods being relatively equal on the east and westside and the communities immediately around False Creek at the bottom of the pack The similarity is only skin deep however given that we are seeing the emerging dominance of the more expensive westside neighbourhoods as having the highest percentage of people in this age category With the exception of Dunbar Southlands that has remained at the top in all categories to date most of the neighbourhoods are new to upper ranks Once again I believe there is a relationship between what we are seeing and the era in which these children were born Our graph below showing average home prices over the past three decades depicts at time between 1993 1988 during which homes were almost at their lowest Certainly this gave families with children many more neighbourhood options when choosing a location to live and naturally many people gravitate towards the areas with the largest lot sizes Vancouver average home costs interest rates and population distribution between 1980 and 2008 For a larger version click here Another interesting phenomenon we see here is the decline of South Cambie below the city average Given that the percentage of children in the area has remained consistently high in the other age categories it s curious that the oldest group and seemingly least demanding to house spatially given their independence would place it among the lower communities Furthermore in terms of statistics the neighbourhood is similar to several of its above average neighbours Your guess is as good as mine In order to bypass any repetition particularly about the characteristics of the neighbourhoods at the bottom of the spectrum I m going to leave it at that for now The next and final piece is going to look at the

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/25/cartographically-speaking-kids-13-18-years/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Cartographically Speaking: Where are the kids? - 6-12 years - Spacing Vancouver
    side and West side neighbourhoods Vancouver real estate values interest rates and population 1980 2006 For a larger version click here A comment discussed in Chad Skelton s series suggests that this pattern may be due to the fact that as families with children grow older they become more financially stable and thus have the ability to move to higher income neighbourhoods Something worth thinking about But there are a lot of assumptions and unanswered question within that statement For example does everybody really want to live in these higher income areas Are they in fact better for raising kids And if so what physical attributes make it so Given the limited information I have to work with I m not willing to argue for or against this hypothesis What is blatantly clear however is that in keeping with the patterns to date the lowest percentage neighbourhoods are the areas that have seen the most intense development over the past few decades West End Downtown Fairview and Kitsilano With minimal population of families having children 12 years of age and under it worth thinking about this further After all these are also the very same neighbourhoods touted as the most livable and sustainable in the world and that are being used as models for new urban developments abroad A simple question rises how is it that the current definition of livability and sustainability doesn t include families with children It is said that cities designed for children are cities designed for everybody since kids require the amenities and spaces that everybody enjoys Following this thought it s pretty troubling that the public is continually bombarded by media developers politicians and city officials alike that the types of developments that define these neighbourhoods should continue without question To be clear I m not attempting take away from the benefits of density or the higher density building types that characterize these neighbourhoods point towers and mid rise buildings in particular I m a big advocate of density done well But the reality of the information explicitly shows that Vancouver architects planners and developers have done and continue to do a poor job of using these new developments as opportunities to create more inclusive diverse neighbourhoods Instead they are creating transient communities where people live for short periods of times before or after they have children A time that s quite limited relative to the typical phases of one s life Clearly these areas don t meet the needs of families with young children in price or space or amenities or services or all of the latter Consequently if there were once amenities and services to serve families with children 12 and under in these areas typical urban patterns show that they won t be there much longer since they will move to where they can be closest to those they serve So starts the positive feedback loop that without intervention will see these False Creek neighbourhoods specialize to serve the transient demographic

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/24/kids-6-12-years/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Cartographically Speaking - Where are the kids? - 3-5 years - Spacing Vancouver
    are starting to create a more equally distributed pattern across Vancouver Surprisingly Commercial Drive s Grandview Woodlands has fallen below the average something one who frequents the area would never guess from direct observation That said the majority of children between three and five years old still lean heavily towards Vancouver s eastside At the top of the ranks we find the strongly middle class and ethnically diverse neighbourhood of Sunset and the wealthy enclave of Dunbar Southlands what seems to be developing as the hub for families with children on Vancouver s West side At the opposite end of the spectrum as was the case last time we see the neighbourhoods wrapping around False Creek with the lowest percentages West End Downtown Strathcona Fairview and Kitsilano Vancouver real estate values vs population For a larger version click here Explaining how and why the percentage of children is beginning to equalize across the city is extremely difficult because there may be a number of relevant factors However one issue may be the overall cost of housing at the time that these children were being born that is between 2001 and 2003 given that this data is from the 2006 Census Looking at the adjacent graphic showing average house costs since 1980 we see that homes were hovering between 270 000 300 000 and interest rates light grey band at the bottom of the graph were plummeting This means that attaining homes in the more expensive areas of the city would have been much more attainable at this time than for those families in the last article I m not saying housing was cheap by any stretch of the imagination I recall that people considered such home prices very high at this time However overall land values across different neighbourhoods in the city were much closer to one another than even two years later This means that a stable middle income family could conceivably stretch themselves to purchase a home in say Dunbar Southlands With increasing land values heightening cost differences across neighbourhoods this becomes less and less possible As with the last age group it is clear that all the above average neighbourhoods with children between three and five are dominantly in single family home communities In keeping with the trend so far the lowest percentage locations are the very same neighbourhoods that have seen the vast majority of new development over the past decades and in turn have highest density house types such as point towers and multi story apartment buildings A pattern seems to be forming here so let s see if it continues to play out next time when we look at the distribution of children between six and twelve years of age Other Where Are The Kids series articles Children Under 3 Erick Villagomez is one of the founding editors at Spacing Vancouver He is also an educator independent researcher and designer with personal and professional interests in the urban landscapes His private practice Metis Design

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/23/cartographically-speaking-kids-3-5-years/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Cartographically Speaking: Where are the kids? - Under 3 years old - Spacing Vancouver
    Downtown and Strathcona This slightly skews their percentages but not too significantly Turning to our map then the Eastside bias for neighbourhoods with children is clearly evident With the exception of Dunbar Southlands all the neighbourhoods with above average percentages of children under three years old are located predominantly east of Cambie St The issue of Dunbar Southlands a West side anomaly is pretty curious since many factors suggest it shouldn t be among the top Based on 2001 census data for example it is a neighbourhood declining in numbers with a growth of 0 5 between 1996 and 2001 It s ethnic composition based on the mother tongue spoken is one of the least diverse in Vancouver being predominantly English speaking 71 which contrasts other neighbourhoods with many children Furthermore Dunbar Southlands is one of least dense areas dominated by people age 40 64 36 6 The typical beginner family age range between 20 39 make up only a quarter of the population This is not the case in all other above average neighbourhoods where the dominant population age lies within 20 39 Lastly the Dunbar Southlands population has one of the highest average family and household incomes in the city more than double most other above average neighbourhoods and undoubtedly some of the highest real estate values In essence it seems to go against almost all the typical factors that would suggest a profusion of children But sure enough here it is I m dwelling on this a bit because you will see it in the upper ranks continuously As the data suggests Dunbar Southlands seems to be the wealthy family neighbourhood of choice in Vancouver Despite the latter however above average neighbourhoods typically are the clearest indicator of where housing prices were the most affordable relative to the amount of space desired to house a small family at the time of the data collection It s more appropriate to continue to speak about this later when when we can see a larger pattern emerge from comparing all maps together For now it is simply worth noting that between 2003 and 2006 I believe this is 2006 data this is where families with young children gravitated To get a better understanding of the times here is an older graphic of mine comparing Vancouver real estate values and population since 1980 From this we can see these times were much different than our own with the average home costing approximately 300 000 Vancouver real estate costs vs population graphs For a larger version click here It will be interesting to compare the data of the next census to see if and how rising house prices affect this pattern Will there be fewer blue neighbourhoods hugging the eastern boundary of Vancouver Hopefully I ll be lucky enough to come across this information when the time comes and make a direct comparison When thinking about this map it s also very important to remember that the numbers are rooted in a

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/06/22/cartographically-speaking-kids-3-years-old/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Maps Archives | Page 2 of 2 | Spacing
    Waterfront Region Topic Maps Vancouver Cartographically Speaking Eric Fischer s Geotagged Vancouver Labelled By Erick Villagomez To see a larger version click here As most people know the digital age has created renaissance in cartography and it seems as Read More Cartographically Speaking Canada by Land Cover Type By Andrew Cuthbert The series of maps below are a Canadian version of a project called Minimal Maps by Michael Pecirno The original project took a Read More Toronto Good Reads Spring 2015 Edition of Fort York s newsletter Fife Drum By Shawn Micallef The spring edition of the Friends of Fort York s quarterly newsletter Fife and Drum was released recently Loads of maps and Read More Finding our way by bike By Toronto Cycling Think and Do Tank This post by Natalie Corbo is part of Spacing s partnership with the Toronto Cycling Think and Do Tank at the University of Toronto Read More Edmonton Edmonton Streets By Erik Backstrom There s a little bit of Edmonton in Saskatoon and Smithers Gatineau and Guelph In a trailer park in small town Michigan and an Read More RELEASE Visualizing the City and Beyond Infographic Competition By Spacing Visualizing the City and Beyond Infographic Competition Deadline March 30th 2015 Submit an infographic and win Do you love data Read More Post navigation Newer posts Our complete archives are available via our city blogs Maps Archives Spacing Toronto Maps Archives Spacing Montreal Maps Archives Spacing Vancouver Maps Archives Spacing Ottawa Maps Archives Spacing Atlantic Maps Archives Spacing Edmonton Maps Archives Spacing Calgary Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s Guide to Toronto Events Nov 15 21 Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter LORINC How to

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/maps/page/2/ (2015-11-16)
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  • EVENT: Chinatown Mah Jong Social (Round 2), July 11th - Spacing Vancouver
    hot and noisy back to Chinatown this Summer Did you miss our last Mahjong Night Are you yearning for the sound of clicking tiles Come out for a night of outdoor mahjong It s a balmy summer night for playing learning and teaching mahjong all the while sharing stories about Chinatown Don t know how to play There will be plenty of pros ready to teach you the basics and send you on your way to becoming a tile shark Don t like mahjong No sweat there will be plenty of other games including Chinese chess Chinese checkers or Big Two aka Chinese poker 鋤大D The new Youth Collaborative for Chinatown is a network of youth doing awesome stuff in for and with Chinatown Mahjong Night is just the beginning so come learn more about the YCC and sign up as a Collaborator or just play a round of mahjong and wish us luck This is an all ages affair Bring your grandparents bring your siblings bring your friends Have an extra mahjong tile set or mahjong table Get involved and in touch with us at the Youth Collaborative for Chinatown ycc yvr gmail com Help bring the hot and noisy back to Chinatown this summer 日期 2015 年 7 月 11 日 星期六 時間 晚上6時至9時 地點 基化街 105 號 華埠悼念廣場 今年仲夏 齊來為唐人街增添熱鬧氣氛 同來分享耍麻雀之樂 無論您是初學 者或是高手 都無任歡迎 除了麻雀之外 還有充滿童年回憶的象棋 波子棋和鋤大D 青心在唐人街 即將為唐人街 展開一連串的精彩活動 誠意邀請您來與大家一起耍耍麻雀 認識和支持我們 ycc yvr gmail com Help Spread the Word Like and share the YCC Facebook Page Follow ycc yvr on Twitter Use Chinatownyvr ycc hotandnoisy Join the Facebook Event Check out our in progress website http ycc yvr com Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Identifying Intangible Heritage Values for Vancouver s Chinatown EVENT Urbanist Meetup Sunday August 9 2015

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/07/03/event-chinatown-mah-jong-social-round-2-july-11th/ (2015-11-16)
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  • A proud history of sidewalk superintendents in Toronto - Spacing Toronto
    passes right by when the lack of accommodation for spectators becomes apparent the story explained In 1947 the Globe and Mail clarified an important difference between sidewalk superintendents and mere kibitzers A superindendent wrote columnist Billy Rose watches a gang of men digging a hole in the ground and is satisfied A kibitzer on the other hand waves his hand at the gent behind the crane and advises A little to the right buddy Let her down easy now Most sidewalk superintendents rate a kibitzer two notches lower than the peeping tom Sidewalk superintendents were typically male white collar workers employed in the burgeoning financial district A man who can t change a washer on a tap gets a vicarious thrill out of watching these tons of steel girders being shoved in to place wrote Frank Tumpane also in the Globe and Mail their coverage of this topic was excellent The downtown section of Toronto is swarming what with all the building in progress Tumpane said You can hardly move a block without bumping into half a hundred of them with their backs lined up against a wall watching a crane or their noses shoved over the edge of an excavation scanning a steam shovel The Bank of Nova Scotia addresses its sidewalk superintendents in December 1949 The Bank of Nova Scotia offices were a prime target in 1947 but superintending reached its zenith with construction of the Yonge subway line in the early 1950s The level of curiosity in the mostly cut and cover excavation was so great that the TTC set up special viewing areas overlooking the trench and even issued special sidewalk superintendent manuals There were five of them in the series explaining the methods of construction charting the line s progress and finally telling wide eyed riders how to ride the new subway A TTC ode to the sidewalk superintendents At other construction sites developers were realizing that catering to sidewalk superintendents was a cheap way to generate positive PR Peepholes in wooden siding became windows and projects that involved deep excavations sometimes installed balconies directly over the pit Proctor and Gable hung artwork by local Deer Park kids on the hoarding surrounding their 21 storey office project at Yonge and St Clair in 1963 and over in Montreal the Canadian Lumbermen s Association put up a wooden observation tower at the Expo 67 site in 1965 During the late 1960s however the supers of Toronto appeared to be losing their passion for construction Perhaps burned out by decades of clanging steel and rumbling excavation newspapers reported fewer eyes at the peepholes Torontonians have become so bored by their building boom that they hardly ever even seem to bother to raise their eyes skyward any more wrote journalist Bruce West Members of the public watch construction Yonge Street and Melinda Street May 16 1951 City of Toronto Archives Series 381 File 127 Item 8259 2 There was a brief revival in the 1970s however The builders

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/05/27/proud-history-sidewalk-superintendents-toronto/ (2015-11-16)
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