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  • Events Archives - Spacing Atlantic
    keynote speaker Rollin Stanley By Spacing HALIFAX Fusion Halifax is excited to host its fifth annual VivaCity on Thursday October 21 at the World Trade and Convention Read More Events Guide Transit 101 By Abad Khan HALIFAX Interested in learning more about public transit A bit more information on Metro Transit s network redesign Read More Dalhousie University making a difference on the road in a province wide online campaign By Niki Siabanis It s no question that Nova Scotia s roads come in all shapes and sizes sometimes lacking shoulders sidewalks and not to mention Read More Bringing Government Home Municipal Reform and Election 2013 By Sam Austin HALIFAX A provincial election campaign is underway in Nova Scotia and municipal reform particularly home rule for Read More First RP 5 Community led Session By Ross Soward In November the Regional Plan 5 will go to Public Hearing Council will be asked to adopt a plan that will guide the Region in terms Read More Events Guide Switch Open Street Sundays Dream Session By Ross Soward HALIFAX Why did you attend Switch Open Street Sundays on June 9 Is it for the Recreation Family Fun to make a political Read More It s soon time to Switch By Ross Soward HALIFAX What is the public domain Streets are often left out of the equation This Sunday Switch Open Street Sunday caps off Bike Read More Events Guide Planning for Non Planners By Jared Dalziel HALIFAX Wondering how the city changes Want to get involved in making it happen FUSION Halifax s Urban Development Action Read More Post navigation Older posts Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts Stadium Dreams at Shannon Park From the Vaults Gottingen Street Urban Development Does Halifax need to

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/events/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Features Archives - Spacing Atlantic
    the city to promote businesses and pedestrian activity Read More Urban Planet Art structure made of bicycles By Jonathan Zettel It took 760 bicycles stacked on top of each other to create this massive art structure Chinese artist Ai Weiwei produced the stunning Read More Urban Planet Introducing Wendy the smog eater By Jonathan Zettel This giant spiky blue pavilion known as Wendy is making its rounds to showcase how architecture can stretch the limits ignite the Read More Urban Planet NASA NOAA cities at night By Jonathan Zettel Check out these stunning space visuals of sprawling city lights etching their way across the earth Scientists from NASA and NOAA are Read More Urban Planet Soda bottle lights By Jonathan Zettel In low income communities across the globe natural light is often unavailable in windowless homes crowded together under corrugated Read More Urban Planet Walkability boosts city s economy By Jonathan Zettel After being hit hard by the national housing crisis the city of Lancaster in California was looking for ways to grow With the newly Read More Urban Planet Living green in Tokyo By Jonathan Zettel Japan might not be first country that comes to mind when we think

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/features/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Headlines Archives - Spacing Atlantic
    Past Week in Review By Crystal Melville POLITICS HALIFAX 20 years after race riot faces of power still white The Chronicle Herald HALIFAX Dawn Sloane calls Read More Headlines This Week in Review By Crystal Melville POLITICS HALIFAX Concert promoter agrees to pay HRM thousands CBC ST JOHN S St John s city council live blog Read More Headlines This Week in Review By Crystal Melville DEVELOPMENT SAINT JOHN Urban renewal may require some urban demolition first Telegraph Journal DARTMOUTH Buyer Read More Headlines This Week in Review By Crystal Melville DEVELOPMENT CHARLOTTETOWN I think it looks ugly The Guardian SAINT JOHN Grants given to neighbourhood Read More Headlines This Week in Review By Crystal Melville POLITICS SAINT JOHN Saint John council holds confidential meeting CBC HALIFAX Peter Kelly is the Sarah Palin of Read More Headlines This Week in Review By Crystal Melville POLITICS CAPE BRETON CBRM council size under debate CBC HALIFAX New gag order at City Hall The Coast HALIFAX Read More Headlines This Week in Review By Crystal Melville POLITICS SAINT JOHN Port official mulls run for mayor Telegraph Journal HALIFAX Winter parking ban changes to be Read More Post navigation Older posts Search Advertisement Spacing

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/headlines/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Spacing Archives - Spacing Atlantic
    CFMP consultation in front of around 100 concerned Read More Financing Halifax s Elections Part 3 Options By Sam Austin In Part One of Financing Halifax s Elections I explored how political campaign contributions can be problematic due to the potential Read More Financing Halifax s Elections Part 2 The Developers By Sam Austin HALIFAX Where did Halifax s current 16 councillors get the cash for their 2012 campaigns To find out for part two of Spacing Read More Financing Halifax s Elections Part 1 Why Worry By Sam Austin HALIFAX Last week Halifax Regional Council voted to ask the Province to grant the municipality the power to regulate Read More Daylighting Sawmill River Rebutting the Staff Report By Sam Austin DARTMOUTH The topic of daylighting Dartmouth s Sawmill River will be back before Harbour East Community Council this Thursday Read More Our Winter of Discontent Sidewalks and Snow Clearing By Sam Austin HALIFAX After a brutal February and an almost as horrid March Halifax aka Hoth on a nasty day is finally emerging from the Read More A Watered Down Vision Dartmouth s Canal Greenway By Sam Austin DARTMOUTH After 17 years of planning construction of Dartmouth s Canal

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/spacing/ (2015-11-16)
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  • From the Vaults: Gottingen Street - Spacing Atlantic
    McGregor s House 130 Gottingen Street Halifax ca 1890 This is Gottingen Street 40 years ago ca 1900 On the corner Mrs Cooks meat shop Paul s tailor next door and Freeman s furniture store Tom Connors View of Halifax after explosion showing damage to buildings not burned looking West The foreground shows Gottingen Street in the vicinity of Kane Livingstone Stairs and Stanley streets ca 1917 Gottingen Street a few hours after the Halifax Explosion ca 1917 Recently Constructed Hydrostone Houses Gottingen Street at Fort Needham Looking North ca 1921 Aerial view of north end Halifax showing Hydrostone district at centre right ca 1921 Landmarks include High Services Reservoir Robie Street near upper left Richmond School near upper right St Mark s Anglican Church Gottingen Street lower right and Oland Son Breweries Agricola Street near lower left Probable Birthplace of Sir John S D Thompson Prime Minister of Canada ca 1933 109 formally 95 Gottingen Street corner of Prince William Street Halifax 1st Headquarters of 40th Battalion under Lieut Col W P Gibsone World War I Demolished 1947 African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church ca 1938 The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church opened in 1846 It stood for over a century at the southwest corner of Gottingen and Falkland Streets It was demolished ca 1955 The Black Methodist community in Halifax dated back to the preaching of Moses Wilkinson Old Moses and Boston King on the eve of the exodus of the free African Nova Scotians to Sierra Leone in early 1792 MacDonald Furniture Company 15 17 Gottingen Street ca 1945 I P C International Provision Company grocery 35 Gottingen Street ca 1945 Gottingen Street looking north ca 1949 After the Second World war owing to demographic trends and unsuccessful urban planning the area surrounding south Gottingen began to deteriorate so that by the 1970s it presented an unflattering image of urban decay However the area surrounding north Gottingen became renovated and improved Gottingen Street near Falkland looking north Halifax ca 1957 In the 1980s apparently to eliminate social stigma city council changed the name of Gottingen north of Young Street to Novalea Drive Today a trip along the full length of Gottingen Street Novalea Drive passes through diverse neighborhoods that mirror key stages in the history of the North End Gottingen Street at night ca 1962 Gottingen Street at night ca 1962 North End Memorial Library ca 1965 Scan from Canadian Architect April 1968 Gottingen Street Shops ca 1965 Shoppers came to Gottingen for footwear clothes jewellery etc at stores such as Rubins Men s and Boys Wear Macy s ladies wear the Metropolitan Store Woolworth s and Withrow Drugs Reference Notman Studio NSARM accession no 1983 310 number 61778 Notman Studio NSARM accession no 1983 310 number 64154 Halifax Relief Commission NSARM accession no 1976 166 no 110 Lillian Blakeney NSARM accession no 1989 439 Janet Kitz NSARM accession no 1992 359 negative N 7048 Halifax Relief Commission NSARM accession no 1976 166 no 41 NSARM Photo Collection

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2010/11/12/from-the-vaults-gottingen-street/ (2015-11-16)
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  • A visit to McNabs Island, Halifax Harbour's hidden gem - Spacing Atlantic
    a regular ferry the island would have never become such a popular outing The Dartmouth Ferry Commission cancelled ferry service to McNabs in 1928 and a regular boat connection has been largely missing ever since Picnickers boarding the Mic Mac 1885 The impact that a more regular ferry service could have today was proven in the 1980s with the McNabs Island Ferry Company The Company offered more frequent service to the island where they operated a rustic teahouse but the business folded in 1992 While the company was operating visitors to the island rose considerably to almost 30 000 and after its demise visitation fell off sharply dropping by almost half Today the only way to get to McNabs if you don t own your own boat is to charter one A lot of the charter companies do a great job but in terms of convenience and ease they can t replace a regularly scheduled ferry Most of the charters also depart from Eastern Passage which is not central to most of the Halifax Regional Municipality s HRM population A regular ferry from the Halifax and Dartmouth waterfronts would open up McNabs to a new generation There are successful examples from elsewhere in North America of ferries linking park spaces with urban areas including the Toronto Islands the Harbor Islands in Boston and Angel Island in San Francisco In all three cases some form of publicly funded ferry is available and the schedule varies by season In all three places reliably scheduled access has made the islands part of the cultural and recreational life of the city TTC Ferry returning from the Toronto Islands To reconnect McNabs to Halifax all three levels of government need to come to the table McNabs is a provincial park but it also has several national historic sites that are managed by Parks Canada The provincial and federal governments are directly responsible for infrastructure on the island Although HRM doesn t have any specific land interest on McNabs it has general responsibilities for recreation and transportation within the municipality All three levels of government have an interest One obvious idea would be to go back to the future and have Metro Transit pickup where the Dartmouth Ferry Commission left off in 1928 Metro Transit has four ferries in its fleet and three of the four are tied up on weekends and holidays Why not put one into service on a McNabs run on weekends during the summer months If Parks Canada was on board a ferry route could even include a stop at George s Island Parks Canada has been planning to open George s Island to the public for years and adding George s to a McNabs ferry route would considerably increase the ferry s appeal Garrison Pier on McNabs would need to be upgraded to accommodate a Metro Transit ferry but if the province wanted to test the demand before committing to infrastructure improvements one of the existing charters could be hired for

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2014/08/26/near-far-mcnabs-island/ (2015-11-16)
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  • A New Arena for Dartmouth - Spacing Atlantic
    Brickfell Roof Top Soccer Miami FL A rooftop field may not be feasible in a climate like Dartmouth s where winter snow loads are a concern but the point is there are plenty of conventional and even unconventional ways of relocating the ball fields Maybank Field is a much better location for Dartmouth s new arena than Commodore Drive and a mix of sports uses can still be maintained in Crichton Park And yet staff favour Commodore Drive I reviewed the Concept Design Report and the site scoring system to try and figure out why Scoring matrixes are always somewhat subjective and the scoring seems to have been unduly harsh on Maybank and overly generous for Commodore The report is available online but it s not attached to Regional Council s agenda for Tuesday Unless they go looking for it or read it back in 2012 Councillors will only receive the executive summary Commodore Drive received pity points on being in the Regional Centre it s not and on being close to residential It also seemed to score higher than it should have for access to transit having adjacent parking being on a bicycle route and pedestrian accessibility The arbitrariness of it all is revealed when you consider that Maybank was penalized for not having a sidewalk on both sides of the street while Commodore got points for pedestrian access despite being located in a car centric part of the city where few people ever walk Maybank was also scored harshly in many site suitability criteria despite the architectural report which noted that a 4 pad arena that is very close to Halifax s generic template can work on the site A whole post could be written on the scoring but suffice it to say it feels slanted in favour of Commodore Drive This is likely because Commodore Drive is cheaper and easier to build on and that s what s really driving the recommendation to Council Commodore Drive may be the cheapest site to develop but it s important to keep perspective on the kind of facility that is being proposed The facilities that the new Dartmouth Arena will replace are on average 30 years old The Halifax Forum has been around for 87 years The choice of location for Dartmouth s Arena is a long term decision that will be with us for generations With that time scale in mind it s worth spending a little bit more money to get it right Maybank Field may not be as pad ready as Commodore Drive but it s a better choice in all the measures that count over the long term The City needs to keep the Regional Plan s goal of getting more people living in the Regional Centre and getting people out of their cars in mind From that perspective Maybank Field is by far the better choice Council would be wise to take a second look Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Small is Beautiful Dartmouth s Findlay Centre and the new Master Plan Stadium Dreams at Shannon Park Our Winter of Discontent Sidewalks and Snow Clearing Daylighting Sawmill River Rebutting the Staff Report Tweet More posts by Sam Austin 8 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Sean Gillis 1 year ago Great piece I m glad you point out how poor transit service is and likely will always be at the proposed Commodore Drive location By comparison the Maybanks site is a great spot for transit now and in the foreseeable future The transit problem is part of a bigger problem as a society we seem to have forgotten about value which is how much you get out of something as opposed to cost which is simply how much you pay for something We cheap out short term and pay for it not always monetarily Low costs and efficiency should always be big considerations but thinking about value captures those good things along with so much more Reply adam 1 year ago The burnside location by the all weather fields won t work and the maybank field spot would be the best if you close a rink in north dartmouth and dartmouth south woodside it would have to be in the same area doesn t it but then a again they close akerley arena when they built bmo center whats next tey will look at shutting down the eastern shore rink and make them drive to the new dartmouth arena Reply Gina 1 year ago My concern for the Maybanks is the loss of other well used ball and soccer fields You mention that the ball fields could be relocated to other parks in the community but which parks Do they have room to add ball fields Would something else be pushed out to give room for the ball fields or over to the soccer fields the soccer fields are well used as well Where will they go The idea of a rooftop soccer field is interesting but would cost a lot for to use than the current grass fields which would cause it to be inaccessible to many users It would be an awesome idea for downtown Halifax though I m not opposed to the Commodore site Transit could easily be brought to the site it should already be there to begin with the soccer fields etc that s a whole other issue The location is regional central and easily accessible by areas just outside of Dartmouth people from other areas use these rinks as well and participate in the programs It s not necessarily Dartmouth Central though I wish staff would do complete research when looking into these long term projects Even some of the questions I have asked could have been easily researched by staff That way like you said this is a long term plan that

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2014/07/28/new-arena-dartmouth/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Urban Development: Does Halifax need to grow up? - Spacing Atlantic
    just grown they are planned Whether Halifax becomes the great city it has the potential to be will depend how well our regional plan downtown plan and development rules address issues like height and density Images by Stephen Cushing Craig James White and Craig Mosher Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Oppose the building not the people Small is Beautiful Dartmouth s Findlay Centre and the new Master Plan Hunter Street s microlofts an answer to building sustainable density in Halifax s urban core Fredericton Junction and New Brunswick s Route 101 Tweet More posts by Derek Simon 14 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Sean Gillis 3 years ago This is a good article on a very important subject but some of the examples of urban density cited are not apples to apples comparisons Paris vs New York for example the city proper of Paris is a very small area accounting for about 1 6 of the metropolitan population whereas the City of New York is a vast city of around 8 million accounting for perhaps 4 out of 10 of residents in the New York metro area A better comparison might be Paris versus Manhattan Sorry to be pedantic but these subtle distinctions are important Comparing Halifax s urban area to Victoria London and Regina sounds straight forward but urban area is undefined Do the numbers for those other cities include adjacent suburbs or just the central city We can t easily get data on the old City of Halifax but I would bet the old city to be twice as dense than the urban area as a whole How would Halifax compare if we took that into account Regardless it s clear that Halifax is sprawling outward creating a lot of issues If we re going to fix this problem we ve got to have an honest discussion about the causes and potential solutions Articles like this are a great start I completely agree that high rises are only a small part of the solution there s no magic bullet Downtown revitalization and urban infill are also only part of the solution some people want to live in the suburbs and some people want to build new Unfortunately a better regional plan as important as that will be is also only a partial solution A plan is only as good as the political commitment to uphold it It s not uncommon for a strong plan to over time be watered down dramatically with amendments Politicians all over the world have a hard time turning down development Derek Simon 3 years ago Thanks Sean That is a good point and it is always difficult to make inter city comparisons Manhattan does have higher density 26 939 square kilometer than Paris However I d argue that s also a bit apples to oranges as Manhattan only includes around 10 of the total metro population of New York I got those Canadian city density figures from a GHP report which you can find here http www greaterhalifax com site ghp2 media greaterhalifax Index 20 20Final 20 28Web 29 pdf My understanding from talking to GHP is they used the StatsCan definition of urban area population centre http www statcan gc ca subjects sujets standard norme sgc cgt urban urbain eng htm If you go to page 69 onward in the GHP report it will give you the density figures for the urban areas population centres in each city plus the percentage of population in the urban area etc It s always tough to make these comparisons but I think London and Victoria both have value as comparators Sean Gillis 3 years ago Thanks for the clarification Derek It looks like the urban area population centre numbers are decent apple to apple comparisons I m really shocked that Halifax is less dense than a Prairie city like Regina The idea of population weighted density is interesting I haven t had a chance to look too closely but I bet it would help out in our discussion http www theatlanticcities com housing 2012 10 americas truly densest metros 3450 One last thought Halifax has great bones for encouraging mid to high density urban neighbourhoods You pointed out the North End and Schmidtville Most of the peninsula s neighbourhoods are great as are many in Dartmouth Where we seem to fall down in the city is the old industrial lands and the strip commercial areas Yonge St Kempt Rd Almon St Wyse Rd Joe Howe Dr etc These areas not only pull down the density of the regional centre they often break up great neighbourhoods There are some huge opportunities here and it will be interesting to see how the Centre Plan addresses them Michael 3 years ago The urban areas are called population centres in the 2011 census Here s the map of the Halifax urban area population centre http www12 statcan gc ca images maps UA RU E A jpg 760 570 0348 jpg As you can see it includes lots of undeveloped land Regina s definition on the other hand seems to match the actual developed areas more closely and Regina has larger contiguous blocks of development because of its simpler geography Even at the census tract level you see the same sort of effects the densest neighbourhood in Halifax is probably Spring Garden Road but it s lumped in with the Citadel and Commons so its census tract density total is meaningless The comparisons between cities are interesting but the census data is really suited to comparing changes in one city over time Thankfully this is what s really important since that s what s needed to see if the urban growth targets are being met or not Derek Simon 3 years ago Another great point I would suggest the relevance of the inclusion

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/atlantic/2012/12/12/urban-development-does-halifax-need-to-grow-up/ (2015-11-16)
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