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  • Cartographically Speaking: Vancouver Neighbourhood Puzzle Named! - Spacing Vancouver
    here for a larger version It was great surprise to see the wonderful response to the Vancouver Neighbourhood Puzzle It seemed to keep many of you busy in your spare time and looking intently at the structure of our city for clues to decipher what which neighbourhood was which There is no better way to learn about the place within which you live So without further ado here is the answer sheet I ll try to post a graphic with all the pieces and together and named in short order In the meantime enjoy Erick Villagomez is one of the founding editors at Spacing Vancouver He is also an educator independent researcher and designer with personal and professional interests in the urban landscapes His private practice Metis Design Build is an innovative practice dedicated to a collaborative and ecologically responsible approach to the design and construction of places You can see more of his artwork on his Visual Thoughts Tumblr Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Visual Thoughts 56 Visual Thoughts 57 Visual Thoughts 53 Visual Thoughts 47 Tweet More posts by Erick Villagomez Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/vancouver/2015/03/11/cartographically-speaking-vancouver-neighbourhood-puzzle-named/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Issue 37 — The Underground Issue - Spacing Magazine
    Gun in 2005 We also look at New City Hall as the city gets ready to celebrate the building and public square s 50th anniversary And illustrator Paul Dotey creates patches for a selection of Toronto parks cover illustration by Mathew Borrett Order Issue Subscribe summer 2015 Issue 36 National Issue spring 2015 Issue 35 The Sky Issue winter 2015 Issue 34 Tech in the City fall 2014 Issue 33 The City Hall Issue summer 2014 Issue 32 NATIONAL Cities For People spring 2014 Issue 31 The Bike Issue winter 2014 Issue 30 10th anniversary issue fall 2013 Issue 29 National Education Urbanism summer 2013 Issue 28 Toronto Modernism Stop the Hate spring 2013 Issue 27 National edition winter 2013 Issue 26 Tall Small fall 2012 Issue 25 National Issue summer 2012 Issue 24 Disaster winter 2012 Issue 23 National Issue fall 2011 Issue 22 Hungry City summer 2011 Issue 21 First National Issue winter 2011 Issue 20 Winter fall 2010 Issue 19 2010 City Hall Election summer 2010 Issue 18 Oh the Spectacle spring 2010 Issue 17 Rules winter 2010 Issue 16 Urban Animals fall 2009 Issue 15 Return of the Suburbs spring 2009 Issue 14 Grey Spaces winter

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/magazine/2015/fall/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Catherine Nasmith - Spacing
    to do it something she was not convinced of would be at grade along the north side of the railway tracks creating a new but traditional street connecting Bathurst to Dufferin Jane Jacobs when she heard of Cathy s proposal was impressed and her innovative problem solving approach entirely changed the way people looked at the expressway extension Finally City Hall agreed that any extension of Front Street was a bad way to spend money and the idea was abandoned This took more or less 20 years As that issue was being discussed there was thought about what to do about the Gardiner Expressway and Cathy was appointed by City Hall as the co chair of the Gardiner Lakeshore Task Force This was a wildly divisive issue but of course Cathy found a way to move ahead She agreed that the place to start was tearing down the section of the Gardiner east of the Don River By bringing people inside and outside of City Hall together to move the project forward she created enough of a consensus to get City Hall approval That demolition happened so long ago that were it not for the remnants of the old ramps that have been carefully preserved near Leslie Street few would remember that this section of the elevated road had ever existed Once again Cathy earned her mark as a great city builder Her determination and optimism bore fruit For the last decade her energy has been directed to protecting our built heritage In the 1990s she was connected with a distant relative Sir James Dunbar Nasmith a leading architect in Scotland with a reputation for enhancing existing structures and creating great performance spaces Sir James introduced her to a program in Edinburgh where one or two days a year the public was given free entry into fine old buildings both public and private in order to admire and appreciate them She arranged for half a dozen people from Toronto including several city staff to go to Scotland to see for themselves They were dazzled The result was the first Doors Open program in Toronto in 2000 which had four or five dozen buildings in Toronto open to all Torontonians the last weekend in May It was such a successful program that it has become an annual event ever since It has been adopted by many municipalities in Ontario across Canada as well as copied in New York City She has been involved in working to save many buildings and has retained her optimism even when the authorities are unsympathetic as they were with her important campaign to protect the views of the Legislative Building at Queen s Park She has worked hard with communities to establish heritage districts She is an outstanding architect a fine designer one of those rare professionals who understand the nuts and bolts of building a lover of the modern as well as the heritage and she has gained awards for her skills at architectural restoration

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/jane-jacobs-prize/jane-jacobs-prize-winners/catherine-nasmith/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Spacing Magazine - Spacing
    rather than starting with an ideological or theoretical approach about how things work you should start with observing closely and drawing your lessons from there As Matt Blackett one of Spacing s founders explains the magazine has a strong focus on the good things that are happening in the city The magazine and its website www spacing ca help us understand parts of the city that many of us do not visit or live in They always start at the level of the street and what actually happens in the urban landscape they reveal what is hidden but should be seen and understood They even make the suburbs look good and show that they are not the complete wasteland as many would describe them Picking up a copy of Spacing you may come across an article about the beauty of sewer maintenance hole covers a feature story about the rules that govern Torontonians in their daily lives a map that shows where we live dictates how Torontonians get around and a special issue on water describing everything from wading pools the ravines to water towers Spacing is not an advocate for a particular issue With its collective team of writers it promotes the healthy discussion of a whole range of issues from a variety of perspectives It has become influential in the city by drawing together a whole new generation of writers photographers illustrators and bloggers who love the city and observe it and interact with it They have made a decision to make Toronto their home They want this city to be one of the greatest places to live in this country if not the world And over the years many of these writers have spread out to other publications and taken their interest and influence on city issues with them As Matt says You can complain all you want but if you don t do anything about it if you don t share your ideas you end up with the city that you deserve From that perspective we want to get out there and make sure that our voices are heard When Spacing began media coverage of city issues had often been negative and issues such as the TTC and development were treated in isolation But these issues are inter related Matt explains that our job we thought was to make sure that those connections were always being made So that if you want you can have a nice big and beautifully designed building But if you don t have proper transit to support then people are going to drive and your experience of the sidewalk outside that beautifully designed building is not nearly going to be as nice as it could be Increasingly Spacing exposes us to the best of what works in cities across Canada and around the world Themes such as sustainable living successful community planning and smart development are being explored Then there are the subway buttons Since 2004 as a way to raise

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/jane-jacobs-prize/jane-jacobs-prize-winners/spacing-magazine/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Derek Ballantyne - Spacing
    were made and in the way residents felt about the communities they lived in The solutions weren t easily apparent how to engage workers and residents in the idea of a new organization A lot of anger a rigid bureaucracy and a long history of unfulfilled promises had been inherited from the earlier organizations But just as important but of less interest to the media there was a tremendous reservoir of committed community minded residents and staff who could be the building blocks of a different culture Ultimately the answer was not to create one organization but to reorganize the company into numerous neighbourhood based Community Housing Units each operating within the financial and value system of the whole company but encouraged to interact and innovate within its own neighbourhood By listening closely to frontline staff and making tenants active participants in the change things slowly started to turn around The outlines of a different company began to emerge What Derek and his team learned was that tenants wanted to have a voice and wanted to have a say in how to make their community a safer and better place to live Today there is certainly no shortage of suggestions from the tenant body who now participate in elections that are larger in size than many of Canada s smaller cities Since 2002 tenants have also sat on advisory tenant councils which address local issues allocate resources and develop local business plans And Derek adds After a couple of years when TCHC became known as a better place to work we began to attract bright and dedicated people who had worked in the community based sector where I started as a volunteer They had skills and fresh ideas which a large organization can support with resources It was win win all round Derek also looked at how to overhaul the financial picture It was pretty clear until quite recently that the senior levels of government were not going to provide the funding we needed to repair our units Unless we could leverage some cash flow from the housing assets we were not going to be able to improve the living conditions in our communities We realized that with the size of TCHC we were a market unto ourselves and could compete both internally and externally We went through a long and complicated rating process a first for a social housing organization in Canada And ultimately based on the quality of our assets and cash flow we were able to borrow at very competitive rates over 250 million dollars It still wasn t enough but it allowed us to start the rebuilding and repair programs in earnest Derek and his team came up with the idea of setting up their own service providers For example they created Housing Services Inc a construction and management company wholly owned by TCHC which bids on contracts both within and outside the portfolio TCHC also helped create a laundry service with private sector investors that

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/jane-jacobs-prize/jane-jacobs-prize-winners/derek-ballantyne/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Nick Saul - Spacing
    issues Nick s roots are strongly anchored in an activist background His early years were spent in Dar Es Salaam where his father a political scientist was teaching at the University of Tanzania and active in the country s liberation struggles After returning to Canada the family spent another year in Africa where Nick at the age of 15 attended school in Mozambique struggling in Portuguese It was a transformative year I had taken everything for granted in Canada you turn on the tap and the water comes I learned that not everyone has access to these resources Nick s family chore was to stand in rationing line ups for milk and bread for the evening dinner table His final high school years were spent at Jarvis Community Collegiate in Toronto where he was a self described basketball jock In his final year at the University of Toronto he became involved in politics and in the aftermath of the 1990 election which saw the NDP into power he had a moment of dumb luck and was literally tapped on the shoulder and asked to work in the Premier s office by David Reville who was then working as a special advisor to the Premier An intensive year of working with Reville convinced Nick that to be effective civil society needs to be strongly connected to the work of government He honed his community organizing skills in Alexandra Park a downtown public housing project knocking on doors and convincing tenants to convert their rental housing into cooperative housing At the time Alexandra Park was one of the first extremely diverse areas of the City of Toronto the final vote was 76 in favour of conversion I learned to listen to what people have to say and create a vehicle to help

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/jane-jacobs-prize/jane-jacobs-prize-winners/nick-saul/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Roberto Martella - Spacing
    bring us together We need to get out of our psychic enclaves and recognize how much we share in common Jane liked the idea of what she called commensality the building of community by breaking bread together says Alan Broadbent founder of the prize Roberto understands this in his bones and has made Grano so much more than just a restaurant It has become a vital centre of social cohesion in Toronto Roberto grew up in the Bathurst Dupont area of the City of Toronto where his father owned a number of barber shops After graduating from high school and the University of Toronto his first job was as an after care officer at the St John s School for Boys and later as a corrections officer at the Vanier Centre for Women His future career began to emerge when after a tour of Europe he traveled to Japan on an student exchange program in 1975 On Sado Island he met a young Japanese drumming group Ondekoza now the Kodo Drummers which combined meditation and running with traditional music Members of the group still travel to North America each year to run the Boston Marathon and travel to Toronto where Roberto entertains them Back in Canada he became the general manager of the Canadian Italian Business Professional Association and involved in food and wine importation and small p politics within the Italian community Roberto says 1982 was a turning point for the Italian community in Toronto With the World Cup win there was a spontaneous outpouring on St Clair Avenue West This was before the days of the cell phone and text messaging It was really a coming of age of the community here In 1986 Roberto and Lucia purchased part of the current Yonge Street property and opened the

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/jane-jacobs-prize/jane-jacobs-prize-winners/roberto-martella/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Steve Munro - Spacing
    the TTC with his father to explore the city and the streetcar system At the time Toronto had an extensive network of streetcar routes one of the few cities in North America not to have abandoned these surface routes to buses and underground systems However with the opening of the Yonge Street subway system in 1954 and the subsequent Bloor Danforth line in 1966 it seemed that Toronto s streetcar was headed for the historical museum The Streetcars for Toronto Committee was formed in 1972 to fight for the retention and expansion of the streetcar system as a way to provide low cost rapid transit service to growing suburban areas As a student at the University of Toronto Steve was part of that Committee and subsequently became its chair The Committee a community activist group had initial success in persuading the TTC to eliminate its streetcar abandonment policy and begin a systematic refurbishing policy of existing stock until a new manufacturer of streetcars could be found Although Streetcars for Toronto disbanded in the 1980s Steve remained active as a transit advocate on many fronts service quality maintenance and funding at a level which would allow transit to grow and attract more riders This was often a lonely battle with a car oriented culture and a metropolitan region where public transit was seen as a frill for people living downtown Through the eighties and nineties Steve unwaveringly provided a vision for anyone who would listen politicians journalists and other community activists of what transit could become for the city The TTC s Ridership Growth Strategy and Transit City would not exist without Steve s long hours of advocacy that The Better Way could be much more than just a marketing slogan Steve is a frequent commentator on transit in Toronto and

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/jane-jacobs-prize/jane-jacobs-prize-winners/steve-munro/ (2015-11-16)
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