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  • REID: Laneways as shared spaces - Spacing Toronto
    quite used to sharing The image above is of a narrow laneway near my home and it s used by people in cars on bikes and on foot including students walking to the nearby school We negotiate the space instinctively Cars aren t that frequent and they tend to move slowly When a car comes through people on foot or bike stand aside if there is space and if there isn t space the car waits for them to get by Laneways are also used across the city for children s games such as street hockey one of the goals of residential shared streets such as woonerfs in the Netherlands Laneways are not ideal as shared streets certainly and some enhancement might be welcome Fellow panelists landscape architect Victoria Taylor and landscaper Jonas Spring talked about an intriguing idea to create laneway punctures that could add to this shared street feeling Inspired by the plants that grow in any available crack in the concrete they propose creating a groove in the drainage channel of a laneway in which to plant hardy low lying plants Such a groove wouldn t interfere with travel but would add an element of variety and the unexpected to a laneway Such variety is a core element of shared street design serving to encourage drivers to pay greater attention and slow down as a result Street art can serve the same purpose While we often focus on street art and cool little houses when we talk about laneways thinking of them as shared streets reminds us of their core purpose which is transportation and circulation However there are several issues that impact the use of laneways for walking and cycling Laneways are not cleared of snow and ice in the winter which can make them more dangerous to use on foot and impractical on bike At night laneways even if well lit are intimidating to many people There are not many eyes on the street or escape routes For those with mobility challenges or visual impairments the shared nature of laneways can be more dangerous and laneways often lack accessible features If they are too narrow there might not be room to stand aside and unlike true shared streets pedestrians don t have priority New laneways have to be 6 metres wide due to fire regulations which effectively makes them streets and makes it more likely cars will speed Despite these issues laneways can work as an attractive off road route for pedestrians and cyclists within the city a quiet and low traffic escape from busy streets Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts REID That s a nice laneway but it s no woonerf The slow and deadly evolution of Toronto s crosswalks REID Busting some myths about pedestrian collisions EVENT A Walk With Born to Walk author Dan Rubinstein Tweet More posts by Dylan Reid 2 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2014/11/25/reid-laneways-shared-spaces/ (2015-11-16)
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  • 10 NO BRAINERS: Open the Core to Food Trucks - Spacing Toronto
    Vending Permit and the high prices and tight restrictions that come along with it Zane Caplansky owner of Caplansky s Deli and Toronto s first food truck Thunderin Thelma proposes his No Brainer to open Toronto s core to food trucks By altering the permitting fees and restrictions Toronto could welcome food trucks into our downtown adding vibrancy to our streets and providing new food entrepreneurs with a point of entry into the restaurant business Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Shredding paper is adding time to your commute MESLIN Connecting the Dots Exposing the influence of lobbyists at City Hall Toronto flirts with participatory budgeting Made in Toronto film Porch Stories premiers at the TIFF Lightbox Friday June 19 Tweet More posts by Claire Nelischer 3 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Naomi 1 year ago I ve spoken to Zane about this very topic several times and I agree with his ideas and concept whole heartedly Having been to places in the US where food trucks are part of the core of the cities I think it would be a wonderful addition to the City of Toronto Bring on food trucks Sean Galbraith 1 year ago While I happen to agree with him it is kind of self serving coming from Mr Caplansky Can we next ask condo developers if they think towers should be taller Roger B 1 year ago I worked in NYC for 7 years and with few exceptions space efficient vendor carts not food trucks are part of the fabric of the city The same thing is mostly the case in Toronto with the exception of the embarrassing block

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2014/09/17/10-brainers-open-core-food-trucks/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Claire Nelischer, Author at Spacing Toronto
    Pop Ups 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Safe Simple Street Festivals 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Lead the Way for Cyclists 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Free the Parks from Permit Fees 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Open the Core to Food Trucks 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Activate our Laneways 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Foster Fruit Trees 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Practice Participatory Budgeting 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read More Film Video 10 NO BRAINERS Reclaim our Visual Environment 10 No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at Read

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/clairenelischer/ (2015-11-16)
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  • 10 NO BRAINERS: Foster Fruit Trees - Spacing Toronto
    No Brainers to Make Toronto More Awesome is a project of the Centre for City Ecology that highlights small achievable actions at the City level that would improve life in Toronto s neighbourhoods right now A series of 10 short videos will be released on Spacing Toronto from Sept 15 19 highlighting 10 No Brainers contributed by a diverse cast of Torontonians The project will wrap up with a free Pop Up Event where City Council candidates can pitch which No Brainer they d champion at City Hall and the public can join in the conversation October 9 in the East End Out of all the bright ideas featured in the series this one is just such a No Brainer In Toronto our Private Tree By law requires a permit for activities that would involve the injury or removal of any tree larger than 30cm in diameter at breast height But what about all of our lovely little fruit trees many of which don t grow large enough to be protected under the current by law Here Lorraine Johnson local urban agriculture advocate and author of City Farmer Adventures in Urban Food Growing shares her No Brainer to foster fruit trees in the city and connect us more deeply with how and where our food is grown Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts MESLIN Connecting the Dots Exposing the influence of lobbyists at City Hall PARKS IN CRISIS part 5 The system worked slowly for a west end park Toronto flirts with participatory budgeting MESLIN If a billboard falls in a forest Part 3 Tweet More posts by Claire Nelischer Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2014/09/16/10-brainers-foster-fruit-trees/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Urban Voids as Transcultural Spaces - Spacing Toronto
    there is an absence of permanent dwellings Highway infrastructure has formed shameless spatial compositions and dysfunctional voids in cities unused pieces of land isolated by highway exits or turn offs These urban voids or islands created by the construction of the Don Valley Parkway equal 35 hectares Rather than trying to demolish and reshape the infrastructure we could consider appropriating the land within these voids If these lands were to be used for agricultural purposes they could harvest a volume of produce to feed large areas of our city These pieces of leftover land are vast each covers more than 1 hectare low in value and located within an urban metropolis qualities that directly respond to the major obstacles often found to creating productive land in urban areas Transcultural spaces Transforming these islands created by the Don Valley Parkway into productive landscapes could engage various social and community groups Planting gardens on these sites could provide jobs for people with limited resources and increase the broader community s access to healthy food The project is envisioned as three phases Phase 1 A marker of change The first phase of this project would be to build a landscape component a constructed wetland that filters the highway runoff through a stepped landscape The filtered runoff would be stored in a reflecting pond within an event space in the gardens This landscape component will be what drivers see from the highway Phase 2 a community connector In this phase stepped gardens would be built along with a energy and food house Communities surrounding the Don Valley would be engaged in the production of food Relationships with similar facilities and organizations such as the nearby Evergreen Brickworks would be established One of the main drivers in selecting this site is its adjacency to the Evergreen Brickworks The use of a gabion wall as a retaining wall is a common method in the valley A rain water collection system would be integrated along with a solar energy harvesting system The water collected in this system could be used for irrigation or with further filtration could be used as palatable water for the food house The food house is comprised of a community kitchen food processing spaces storage space a café and a commercial kitchen It would be a self supporting entity Phase 3 Physical Connector The last phase in the development of these islands would include a physical connection from the east to the west of the valley This would address the Don Valley s lack of connectivity separating east and west city dwellers and accessibility which isolates the valley from the rest of the city The existing Don railroad was another important factor in the site selection process as it spans over half of the valley and has the potential to be used as part of the physical connection The two deep steel beams and series of cross bracing in the existing bridge support the load of the rail track and trains above the

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2014/07/21/urban-voids-transcultural-spaces/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Sonia Ramundi, Author at Spacing Toronto
    the Urban Wetland Editor s note This is the eleventh post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Read More Architecture Recovering Lost Landscape with Productive Infrastructures Editor s note This is the tenth post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Adaptive Archipelago by Kristen Duimering Editor s note This is the ninth post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Urban Aperture Public Space Editor s note This is the eighth post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Urban Voids as Transcultural Spaces Editor s note This is the seventh post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Re linking the Ravine Editor s note This is the sixth post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Enhancing the Urban Water Experience Editor s note This is the fifth post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Finding the Ravine Gateway to Toronto s Urban Edges Editor s note This is the fourth post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Design Read More Architecture Rain to River Storm Water Infrastructure for the People Editor s note This is the third post in a series by students at the John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture Landscape and Read More Post navigation Older posts Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/soniaramundi/ (2015-11-16)
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  • FoodShare's new food trucks aim to give grocery stores food for thought - Spacing Toronto
    thoroughfares walking over a kilometer through pedestrian unfriendly territory or testing one s patience on public transit It s much easier to grab a box of KD from the local corner store Neighbourhoods without adequate access to markets selling affordable healthy food are known as food deserts to view a map of food deserts in Toronto see this post by U of T s Martin Prosperity Institute And many of the food deserts that exist in Toronto can be found in the city s priority neighbourhoods where a higher proportion of residents grapple with low incomes and as this map recently published in the Toronto Star shows it seems a lower proportion of residents own cars While city planners work on rezoning initiatives and other policies to eradicate food deserts FoodShare working with the City of Toronto and United Way Toronto found a more immediate solution mobile food trucks Daniel Viola first wrote about the mobile markets in the 2012 2013 winter issue of Spacing This past October FoodShare launched a new and improved travelling market unveiling a converted TTC Wheel Trans bus designed pro bono by LGA Architectural Partners working with truck retrofitters Crew Chief Conversion We wanted it to feel as market like as possible says LGA s Dean Goodman Once parked a panel on the side of the truck can be pulled down to create shelves on the buses exterior Market goers can peruse the produce inside the truck as well Unlike its predecessor the vehicle is fully accessible and more welcoming in the cold winter months More than just a stop gap measure the Mobile Good Food Market is another example how temporary projects can inspire larger permanent changes by proving their ultimate success Take the pilot project in Time Square which temporarily shut off stretches of Broadway to cars and proved that people would flock to the newly formed public spaces a project that lead to the installation of permanent pedestrianized spaces along the street If we can prove that people will buy food from the mobile food market then other solutions can happen says Fields who describes FoodShare as a change agent The mobile market she explains could eventually give the private sector the courage to expand markets into food desert neighbourhoods They could also inspire other stores to not only increase the fresh produce that they sell but also decrease the prices We re showcasing solutions that can be replicated says Fields Information on donating to FoodShare can be found on its website Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Shredding paper is adding time to your commute The slow and deadly evolution of Toronto s crosswalks The horror of the Rupert Hotel fire still lingers A proud history of sidewalk superintendents in Toronto Tweet More posts by Dale Duncan One comment Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy John 2

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/12/11/foodshares-new-food-trucks-aim-give-grocery-stores-food-thought/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Dale Duncan, Author at Spacing Toronto
    EVENT Education Justice in Toronto The final event of the Justice in Toronto lecture series takes place tomorrow at 230 College Street This free evening lecture will Read More Culture Started from the bottom now we re here The exhibition Hands On Urbanism How to Make a Difference at Urbanspace Gallery until March 7th showcases stories of groups of Read More Events EVENT Justice in Housing in Toronto The Justice in Toronto Lecture Series will hold its second event of 2014 on Thursday February 27 This evening lecture will explore Read More Events EVENT Public lecture on Race Justice in Toronto The Justice in Toronto lecture series will hold its first event of 2014 tomorrow Thursday January 30th with a free lecture and Read More Food FoodShare s new food trucks aim to give grocery stores food for thought In the early 90s when FoodShare first thought up the idea of bringing markets on wheels food trucks filled with fresh affordable Read More Urban Design EVENT Sustainability and its Discontents WHAT Sustainability and its Discontents WHEN Thursday October 17 6 30 8 00pm WHERE Isabel Bader Theatre 93 Charles Street Read More Film Video Making the case for Ontario Place Part 3 The final video in our three part series showcasing new visions for Ontario Place was created by students Christian Rutherford and Read More Film Video Making the case for Ontario Place Part 2 The second video in our three part series outlining new visions for Ontario Place was created by Marisa Maggs of the John H Daniels Read More Film Video Making the case for Ontario Place Part 1 There s been much discussion and debate lately of MGM Resorts International s recently released proposal for Exhibition Read More Post navigation Older posts Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/dale-duncan/ (2015-11-16)
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