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  • New project — Track. listen.local. — set to collect and map songs about Toronto with your help - Spacing Toronto
    a hidden Toronto Hydro sub station and yes there s a song about it We ve plotted all the songs we ve found so far on a map and we are looking for help to build the collection The more suggestions the better Living in a city like Toronto is exciting because of the constant process of discovery We re always being confronted by a shifting collective realm deeply layered and densely populated by a diversity of voices It s touching to be able to connect with others through a common experience of place and this happens in many ways We want to find and share the moments where this can happen through music Our experience of music is increasingly intimate and solitary We carry our personal soundtrack around with us listening to private portable devices Encountering a connection between music and a familiar location can drag us back out into the public realm This enriches our relationship to the music the place and our fellow city dwellers Inspired by the murmur project we will post physical markers around the city allowing people to discover and listen to songs about the place they are in allowing them to navigate the city and its diverse musical landscape at the same time We are at the very beginning of this project and we would love to hear from anyone who can suggest a song related to Toronto especially local musicians The connection between song and site can be of any type It could be expressed through lyrics or simply exist through the experience of the song s creators How to Participate Check the site Email your ideas Twitter tracktoronto Facebook Link to map We are Lauren Barhydt Chloe Doesburg Jonathan Tyrrell We are architects musicians well truthfully only one of us is a musician that s Jonathan of the band the Ketch Harbour Wolves The project began out of conversations at NXNE 2013 Jon had just attended a panel discussion which introduced the 4479 Toronto Music City brand This kind of collective effort between music advocates city council and Toronto tourism was really inspiring The Ketch Harbour Wolves had recently released their album Queen City Volume 1 planned to be the first in a series of 3 albums in which each song relates to a specific site within the city We got to talking later that night before The National show at Dundas Square and we got really excited about the possibility of registering this kind of virtual map in the physical city The murmur project was a natural precedent for this and got us thinking about gathering other songs about Toronto into an expandable archive that could be built and experienced by anyone in the city Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts How is your ward feeling today A dizzy history of revolving restaurants in Toronto A proud history of sidewalk superintendents in Toronto YONGE LOVE Passionate Urban Engagement Tweet More posts by Shawn Micallef

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/08/13/new-project-track-listen-local-set-to-collect-and-map-songs-about-toronto-with-your-help/ (2015-11-16)
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  • The TORONTO sign: How life imitates graphic design - Spacing Toronto
    has reached its apotheosis in the 3D TORONTO sign Photos of Nathan Phillips Square and City Hall now automatically take on the look and feel of a highly designed poster The TORONTO sign is part of a global trend of huge letters in prominent public space It s most direct precedent is the I amsterdam sign Situated behind Amsterdam s Rijksmuseum since 2005 friends visiting the Netherlands are almost guaranteed to post photos of themselves climbing the iconic red and white letters The ONLY LYON sign followed in 2010 and the BUDAPEST sign in 2014 It was only a matter of time that big font would come to Toronto This isn t the first time art has affected landscape Big wooded parks with meandering pathways like High Park in Toronto Central Park in Manhattan and Mount Royal Park in Montreal were all inspired by Romantic landscape paintings of the late 18th century Spreading as a park format worldwide most major North American cities have an equivalent these pastoral parks are a reflection of what people in burgeoning industrial cities needed from their landscapes and how they idealized them But the blending of graphic design and landscape architecture is evidence of a new kind of relationship we ve developed with our civic spaces No longer pastoral retreats à la High Park with our smartphone cameras always close at hand a landscape must be striking and photographable to make an impact And giant Instagram able letters are the most effective way to communicate the core of most messages on social media I was here top photo by Sam Javanrouh Daniel is the Urban Geographer Check out his website and say hello on Twitter Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts That time Toronto City Hall starred in

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/09/23/toronto-sign-life-imitates-graphic-design/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Daniel Rotsztain, Author at Spacing Toronto
    I joined a Lost Rivers walk within the PATH system Typically engaged with tracing the routes of buried creeks within Read More Neighbourhoods Exploring downtown Centreville in the winter A ghost town in more ways than one At the peak of it s population in the 1950s homes cottages and mansions lined the entirety of Toronto Island from Read More Neighbourhoods Storymobile is telling Canada s Main Street stories from Mimico to the Maritimes If you ve travelled through Mimico a waterfront neighbourhood in Toronto s west end during the last few months Read More Architecture Nicknaming the Toronto Skyline why buildings need affectionate names With the L Tower nearing completion Toronto s horizon has been pierced by another iconic skyscraper The L Tower s semicircular form Read More Waterfront Lake Ontario is a Sea A few weeks ago I biked over to The Guild park Known for its collection of modern Toronto ruins a bonus to visiting the park is Read More Culture La Ville Reine The French underground is all around us in Toronto Last week I was driving along College enjoying a jazzy groove on 90 3 FM Espace Musique When the song ended and the hosts returned to Read More Neighbourhoods Keeping warm this winter in Toronto s indoor spaces For most Torontonians Spring couldn t come any sooner The icy cold that has gripped the city since December has let up on only a few Read More Transit The secret Toronto airport express bus Last November my father and I to took the bus to the airport At the regular TTC fare of 3 a ride taking the Bloor Danforth line to Read More Curiosities The most beautiful Dairy Queen in Toronto While exploring the neighbourhoods along Broadview north of the Danforth last week I

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/danielrotsztain/ (2015-11-16)
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  • LORINC: Telling our story - Spacing Toronto
    again Toronto is filled with National Historic Sites that are still hip and happening The new ish Fort York Visitor Centre begins to address the city s self inflicted amnesia but many other cities have gone much further in finding imaginative ways to share the stories of historic areas including the ones that aren t necessarily filled with old mansions or designated structures For example Detour a San Francisco firm has developed a line of audio walking tours you download them onto your device of some of the city s most atmospheric neighbourhoods including more outré places like The Tenderloin which contain tons of social history In other cases physical markers connote historical events that have left no detectable residue Across Europe for example artist Gunter Demnig has been installing stumble stones on the sidewalks where Holocaust victims last lived before being deported the small bricks are engraved with the name of the victim A similar project has been underway in New York for the past decade as volunteers use chalk to mark the homes of victims on each anniversary of the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Co fire Elsewhere in New York Place Matters a joint venture between City Lore and the Municipal Art Society has built up an eclectic selection of highly informative online walking tours for example this one on vernacular architecture in lower Manhattan that include historical information and archival images presented in a slideshow format well suited to portable devices New York is also home to the Tenement Museum which has become one of the city s most visited tourist attractions Its very existence offers a powerful critique of what sorts of buildings are historically valuable not just for tourism but also as a means of creating a heightened awareness of long vanished communities that had little money and plenty of hardship The Lower Eastside LES has been the subject of other place making efforts meant to generate a new sort of consciousness about the way life was lived in a part of the city that became synonymous with crowding poverty and poor working conditions Preservation and public history expert Chris Neville an adjunct professor at Columbia University was part of an LES sign mapping project that installed large placards on private buildings in the LES Each had an archival photo taken at or close to the location of the sign as well as multi lingual quotes from residents who d lived in the area The approach Neville says directly addresses the question of whose history is being told but it also cultivates historical sensibility an awareness in the viewer that they re standing in a place where others have walked and worked lived and died That sense of place he adds can exist or be fostered in areas where original or earlier buildings no longer exist Just as there is a story to how things got built up he says there s a story about how things got erased In Toronto of course we ve erased

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/07/09/lorinc-telling-our-story/ (2015-11-16)
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  • First Canadian Place: 40 years on top in Toronto - Spacing Toronto
    the bylaw was passed They are rethinking what the downtown is used for The steel skeleton of First Canadian Place takes shape City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1526 File 52 Item 20 The First Canadian Place basement was excavated and the steel skeleton of the building started to rise in the last weeks of 1973 A two storey walkway was erected around the construction site to allow curious onlookers the chance to peek in without creating a logjam on the sidewalk Interestingly the developers opted to break the tower into four zones treating each one as though it were a separate building The lower stories were completed and the first and tenants began to move in while the upper levels were still a steel frame Each section had its own bank of double decker elevators which allowed construction workers to ferry materials up the core of the building with minimal disruption The unusual elevator arrangement benefits the tower today By stacking the cars on top of one another office workers on even numbered floors board on a different level to their odd numbered counterparts This innovation reduces crowding during the morning and afternoon rush hour when some 20 000 people move in and out of the building First Canadian Place under construction March 23 1975 City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1526 File 52 Item 5 First Canadian Place became the tallest office building in Toronto and Canada on January 13 1975 when steelworker Gerry Deschamps bolted the first horizontal structural beam higher than the roof of Commerce Court Though construction generally progressed as expected there were hiccups A 150 000 shipment of normally crisp white Carrera marble cladding from Italy had too much grey in it and had to be replaced The first tenants staff belonging to Bank of Montreal moved into the ground floors in July 1975 and the building was fully occupied by December The stats themselves were astounding 45 000 tons of steel 113 kilometres of piping 680 000 kilos 37 300 square metres of glass and 4 400 tons of marble went into making the tower according to a promotional newspaper supplement printed in the summer of 1975 Albert Reichmann one of the co founders of Olympia and York called his company s tower a triumph of open space and nature The author of the supplement wrote that the 17 acre site was previously populated by small shops and dingy lanes Not a blade of grass a flower a tree a bench or inviting public could be found within that vast block Olympia and York hoped the podium would become a magnet for shoppers and diners perhaps even a tourist attraction in its own right a people s place Perhaps they miscalculated the level of affection the people of Toronto would have for the office because it has never been a place the public has chosen to linger en masse First Canadian Place rises behind the Gardiner Expressway March 23 1975 City of Toronto Archives Fonds

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/05/13/first-canadian-place-40-years-top-toronto/ (2015-11-16)
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  • PARKS IN CRISIS part 6: Are privately owned public spaces the answer to parks deficit? - Spacing Toronto
    designated POPS space inaccessible or inhospitable by removing seating or locking gates and even enclosing and decorating POPS arcades so they become the formidably elegant lobbies of private buildings New York has learned the hard way that creating and maintaining public space carries the usual caveat attached to offers of a free lunch Kayden said Kayden who runs New York s own POPS database has concluded that POPS policies pose three substantial dangers they undermine zoning requirements they signal to developers that zoning exemptions are for sale and they are not equitable because unlike public parks few POPS are equally accessible to every citizen The Well s open space proposal That hasn t stopped many North American cities with the recent addition of Toronto from adopting and adapting a New York style POPS policy But this trend raises the question if the results fall so far short of the mark in the city where this approach to public space originate what chance will the policy have of working in Toronto Spacing contacted people involved with The Well s POPS approval visited each of the approved POPS designated sites and analyzed the City s new interactive database Our conclusion at this juncture Toronto s 100 plus POPS fall short of establishing a network of high quality open spaces and certainly don t compensate for the inability of the city to use existing resources and regulations to create new park space in high growth areas Some certainly provide iconic and well used spaces such as the Pasture between the TD Bank towers or the fountain tucked between the wings of Commerce Court A few have trees and ledges where people can sit to talk and eat their lunches But many including the new Iceboat Terrace in CityPark site of last summer s unveiling of the first POPS plaque or the landscaped plaza in front of Tridel s tower at 300 Front Street West appear to be desultory and offer few amenities to pedestrians Toronto architect and scholar Cheryl Atkinson who has studied the history of POPS as well as that of the Wellington West corridor recommends that the city exercise a high degree of caution POPS she writes in a study pending publication in the urban studies journal Spaces and Flows are generally often perfunctory responses to an ever diminishing truly public realm in quantity connectivity and collective consciousness What s critically needed Atkinson continues is a strategy for integrating public space of significant scale continuity and impact into the highly dense core neighbourhoods where they may form a part of the daily social cultural and transportation network rituals of these communities Everybody who agreed to be interviewed on or off the record conceded that POPS are not and should never be seen as a replacement for parks City planners however defend the strategy POPS are important part of framing a city s open space says James Parakh manager of urban design for the city s Toronto and East York district At a recent Canadian Urban Institute s symposium on place making he offered a series of current and future examples PDF showing how POPS can link downtown developments and networks of urban plazas The open space planned for The Well is poised to become downtown Toronto s most ambitious POPS and its evolution in coming years will be well worth watching The developers are going to great lengths to appease the city s requests for light and air the latest plans include a complete redesign and repositioning of a 36 storey office tower to create 37 additional minutes of sunlight on city owned Clarence Square A revised open space proposal submitted to the city s Design Review Panel in late March includes an ambitious internal network of landscaped gardens pedestrian walkways glass covered seating child friendly water features and Parisian inspired flexible furniture It will include wide leafy openings to both Front and Wellington POPS space will be extended to open onto Draper and a cantilevered landscaped berm will turn public land on south side of Front Street into a multi level public parkette All together the owners have proposed transforming 36 of the site about a hectare into new public open space It s still a far cry from New York s largest and most successful POPS the Seagram Plaza which takes up 75 of the site s Park Avenue footprint But by allowing The Well developers to create privately owned public spaces instead of insisting that they turn over land for a city owned park the city The Well s landscape designer Claude Cormier says will receive high quality urban design and public accessibility without incurring the cost of construction and maintenance But what options does Toronto have There is no money to maintain a public park Cormier adds The city is limited in terms of what it can do He is optimistic however that this new synthesis of private vision and public access will produce the sort of great public open spaces that seem to be elusive under existing parkland funding mechanisms This will be open urban space he says This will not be a mall Seagram Plaza photo by Trevor Patt Part 1 All built up but no place to grow Part 2 Where the money flows Part 3 The perils of cash in lieu Part 3 sidebar Section 42 explained Part 4 The tale of two parks Part 5 The system worked slowly for a west end park Part 6 Are privately owned public spaces the answer to parks deficit Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts PARKS CRISIS conclusion 10 ideas to help solve Toronto s parks acquisition crisis PARKS IN CRISIS sidebar How Section 42 works PARKS IN CRISIS part 3 The perils of cash in lieu PARKS IN CRISIS part 1 All built up and no place to go Tweet More posts by Kimberley Noble 7 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/04/21/parks-crisis-part-6-privately-owned-public-spaces-answer-parks-deficit/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Kimberley Noble, Author at Spacing Toronto
    Bikes Cities For People Civic Engagement Communication Community Culture Curiosities Events Features Film Video Food Green Space Headlines History Housing Infrastructure Maps Media Neighbourhoods Parks Photos Politics Services Spacing Streetscape Traffic Transit Urban Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic By Kimberley Noble Parks PARKS IN CRISIS part 6 Are privately owned public spaces the answer to parks deficit Over the next year City of Toronto politicians and planners will be faced with an unprecedented challenge how to create amenable Read More Parks PARKS IN CRISIS part 5 The system worked slowly for a west end park On a warm spring afternoon the park on the corner of Sorauren and Wabash avenues in the west Toronto neighbourhood of Parkdale looks Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s Guide to Toronto Events Nov 15 21 Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter LORINC How to invest with Crosstown s found money The story of Jackie Burroughs a Yorkville laundromat and two of the biggest drug addled bands of t From the Spacing Store 22 Buy yourself a subscription 22 Buy a renewal subscription 22

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/author/kimberleynoble/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Exploring Black Creek, Toronto's mini-LA River - Spacing Toronto
    It s horrific and beautiful at the same time in the way that weird concrete urban things often are where nature has started to reinsert itself in all the little nooks and crannies Not all of the creek is this austere however What makes Black Creek so interesting is how its concrete channel passes through different landscapes Following the section where it slices down the centre of a road the creek passes through a series of parkland before it runs through a golf course and then meets up with the Humber River Here the creek s concrete channel winds its way through mowed grass willow trees with their boughs hanging low over the water and alongside tennis courts children s playgrounds and ponds with green water so still that their surfaces appear solid In some places rocks have been placed in the channel to break up the water creating more of a natural look Geese hang around on the concrete like bored teenagers While signs warn people about the potential dangers of flooding during rainstorms there is no fence to keep you from going down into the channel The banks are sloped gently and the base of the channel is flat and wide on either side of a trench cut down further where the water flows past It s almost like two sidewalks There are other creeks in Toronto that have been corralled into concrete channels like this one Shawn Micallef has written about two others Lavender Creek and Mimico Creek both of which have been at least partly channelized These concrete streams are a weird mix of nature and the hardest parts of urbanity LA s plans are to get rid of the concrete for the LA River and soften the banks in the hopes that this restores some of the natural elements to the river itself But Gehry perhaps not surprisingly given his architecture is interested in preserving the concrete portions of the river calling it an architectural feature All environmental concerns aside I can kind of see his point Concrete is ugly and brutish but that s part of its appeal especially in contrast to the soft green of the parkland around it There is something weirdly lovely in an almost dystopian sense about seeing Black Creek wind its way through the city in its concrete chute on its way to the Humber originally posted on This Land is Parkland Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts 5 subtle signs of lost rivers in Toronto The Canadian stop on the London Underground PARKS CRISIS conclusion 10 ideas to help solve Toronto s parks acquisition crisis PARKS IN CRISIS sidebar How Section 42 works Tweet More posts by Jake Tobin Garrett 3 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy W K Lis 3 months ago Worse is the turning Garrison Creek Taddle Creek and others

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/08/27/exploring-black-creek-torontos-mini-la-river/ (2015-11-16)
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