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  • NFB film shows Toronto as a "boom town" in 1951 - Spacing Toronto
    a glimpse a the Toronto police force roaring out of their headquarters on motorcycles to combat the dread of every growing city congestion Already they were imagining amalgamation of the suburbs and the narrator even adds the way it s going it won t be long before Toronto is a suburb of Hamiliton The growth of Toronto after the war was so rapid that it lead mayor Hiram McCullom to warn during his weekly radio address on CFRB the city is in danger of being strangled by its own prosperity Shortly after this address McCullom split the conservative vote with Nathan Philips and lost his mayoral seat to Allan Lamport The film also contains early footage of the Yonge subway construction While men dig their way through the earth with shovels an elderly woman looks on and says Well I hope they know what they are doing When it comes to transit it s a question we re still asking today Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Gardiner East Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Megacity That time Toronto City Hall starred in Star Trek Tweet More posts by Jonathan Zettel 3 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Kevin 3 years ago Produced by Sydney Newman Who 12 years later would go on to co create Doctor Who at the BBC Small world d 3 years ago Ooops I think we used up the NFB s licenses on this one it s gone black even on their site Robert Archer 3 years ago One AMAZING thing is that the old CIBC building which stands out so prominently in this NFB film

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2012/09/21/nfb-film-shows-toronto-as-a-boom-town-in-1951/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Has Mayor Rob Ford become Mayor Tommy Shanks? - Spacing Toronto
    of Toronto mayor Rob Ford may be life imitating art or pop culture During a moment of time wasting today I stumbled across a series of clips from the early 1980s of SCTV fictional mayor Tommy Shanks In this one scene the bumbling Mayor Shanks is accused of funnelling money from a youth milk fund You ll be excused if you re tricked into thinking that the comedy material used in the ensuing interview was lifted straight from Ford s mayoralty Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Toronto politics in a hashtag Why we need youth created art in public spaces LORINC Denzil goes to the Waterfront Tweet More posts by Matthew Blackett 2 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy scottd 3 years ago I knew Tommy Shanks I worked with Tommy Shanks and you sir are no Tommy Shanks Nick 3 years ago Brilliant Yes Ford is totally channeling Mayor Shanks Comments are closed Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2012/09/20/has-mayor-rob-ford-become-mayor-tommy-shanks/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Fallen Toronto - Spacing Toronto
    Neighbourhoods Parks Photos Politics Services Spacing Streetscape Traffic Transit Urban Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic Curiosities Comments 0 Tweet Fallen Toronto November 11 2014 By Dylan Reid Long time Spacing illustrator Matthew Borrett has re imagined his popular Future Shoreline image which appeared in the magazine s 10th anniversary issue with a winter setting The new image is for a calendar called Fallen Toronto which is being offered as part of a Kickstarter campaign closing Friday Nov 14 to fund post production for the web series Haphead The series creators Jim Munroe and Sean Lerner have also been past contributors to Spacing The calendar will also be available in the Spacing Store opening soon Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts EVENT Haphead Toronto premiere January 22 The Spacing Store s holiday hours Tweet More posts by Dylan Reid Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system Toronto never used Spacing s Guide to Toronto Events Nov 15 21 Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter LORINC How to invest with Crosstown s found money The story of Jackie Burroughs a Yorkville laundromat and

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2014/11/11/fallen-toronto/ (2015-11-16)
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  • IN THIS ISSUE: The next 10 years - Spacing Toronto
    values of the urban movement that has emerged strongly in the past decade including intensification transit cycling walking urban renewal public spaces creativity and sustainability I circulated a preliminary list to Spacing s senior editors and we discussed various possibilities back and forth until we came up with a final but by no means exhaustive or definitive list of 10 big questions that urbanists need to confront over the next 10 years if the movement is to inspire a broader more fundamental positive transformation of cities and Toronto in particular Since Spacing was first published in 2003 the transformation in the discussion about cities in North America and in their policies and programs has been remarkable Many policies urbanists a word that itself emerged over this period only dreamed about 10 years ago have become widely accepted and are being implemented even if there are hiccups along the way and the occasional backlash as Toronto has experienced Think about bike or car sharing for example which hardly existed on this continent 10 years ago but are now widespread and expanding rapidly But for all this transformation in attitudes and policies it is just a first step largely focused on the centres of cities and enjoyed by a limited demographic In the next 10 years the challenge for urbanists will be to level up to find ways to address the urban issues facing all areas and all citizens of our city and other cities in North America The Next 10 Years article in the 10th anniversary issue of Spacing is a contribution to that discussion of how urbanism can move to the next level To read it you ll need to pick up a copy of the 10th anniversary issue at local Toronto locations such as Presse Internationale Book City Type

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2014/02/25/issue-next-10-years/ (2015-11-16)
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  • IN THIS ISSUE: What if it was Spacing's 100th anniversary? - Spacing Toronto
    the cover highlighted unrest in Yorkville hippies and park sit ins In the 70s it was all about stopping the Spadina Expressway Each cover has a write up of what our editors at the time would have been exploring I tried to be cheeky by including as many headlines about transit expansion plans that never saw the light of day I also tried to make fun of ourselves as an example in our 1930s blurb I claimed Spacing had to rent out part of our office to the Toronto Tuberculosis Vaccination League to pay our bills I also claimed that the magazine was accused of employing Communist sympathizers when in 1935 Spacing endorsed soon to be mayor James Simpson a labour and CCF supporter Spacing s printing press was smashed by a baton wielding mob after Percy Parker a leading Liberal declared on the radio that the bells of Moscow will ring when Spacing helps elect a mayor Parker did make such a hyperbolic claim but it was actually the bells of Moscow will ring when Simpson is elected mayor At the top of this page is a 1960 cover that didn t make the cut into the magazine but I felt was worth sharing Below is the 1980s cover and accompanying blurb From the issue The greed is good decade in Toronto came in stark contrast to the protests of the 1970s The popularization of break dancing and video arcades and the resulting NIMBY backlash occupied Spacing s readers But the influence of the suburbs on the built form of the city began to creep into the magazine s pages Also an amazing new transit technology came to Scarborough To see all of our pretend cover designs you have to pick up a copy of the 10th anniversary issue

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/12/19/issue-spacings-100th-anniversary/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Book Review: Thinking about Yonge-Dundas Square - Spacing Toronto
    cities develop the way they do The book starts with a look at the history of perceptions of Yonge Street and attempts to revitalize it beginning in the 1970s Milroy shows that emotional arguments that Yonge was the heart of the city have for a long time been an essential driver for various halting attempts to revitalize it These attempts began with the short lived summer pedestrianization in the 1970s A later attempt yielded only the sidewalk chess tables on Gould Street outside Sam the Record Man s tables that subsequently fell victim to further revitalization efforts The Eaton Centre too was both an attempt at a solution and a cause of further problems The core of Milroy s book is an examination of two very different almost parallel regeneration efforts that intersected in the mid 1990s One growing out of previous efforts was a evolutionary plan developed by Toronto s city planners with a lot of community consultation which included projects such as restoring the facades of buildings along the street As this plan was being developed however another quite different one emerged driven by the then city councillor for the area Kyle Rae and some of the local business and property owners This called for a radical intervention through the purchase expropriation and demolishing of buildings to create a public square and also newly developed commercial buildings around it Milroy refers to this approach as property led entrepreneurial development similar to London s Docklands development or New York s Times Square redevelopment It comes across as a kind of gonzo planning Milroy examines in detail how this plan emerged quite suddenly and was adopted by Toronto s pre amalgamation city council remarkably quickly She also breaks down in considerable detail the kind of rhetoric used by proponents of this plan when it went in front of the OMB a rare foray into examining how parties successfully argue before this tribunal an important issue given the board s power She shows that while the actual intersection of Yonge and Dundas had not previously been considered of much significance by anyone once the plan was in motion it began to be assigned the description of the heart of the city Notably at the OMB the City and the plan s other proponents portrayed the planned square as fully public on the model of Nathan Phillips Square which can be booked for free and only for non profit purposes Milroy details how in 2001 however as the square was being built the City passed new by laws governing the square that established a Board of Management dominated by local business appointees enabled the space to be rented commercially and required it to pay for itself a requirement abandoned in 2005 In effect she argues the square became public only residually when no commercial renter could be found Underlying the whole process she argues was also a desire to chase undesirables out of the area The thing about sausages though is that

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/12/17/reading-list-thinking-planning-urbanism/ (2015-11-16)
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  • IN THIS ISSUE: The future shoreline of Toronto - Spacing Toronto
    thought Spacing might reject my early sketches as being too dark for the magazine but they were excited about it I had previously done a fallen CN Tower illustration for the disaster issue of Spacing and we thought it would be neat to work that into this image too Is there a message behind the illustration The message was not something that was clearly defined in my head as I was making the image If anything I deliberately wanted it to be kind of ambiguous and perhaps a touch surreal I wanted it to be complex and not pin it down with a tidy story When a friend saw the work in progress he joked that maybe I was channeling the collective anxiety of the city Maybe so though I was not trying to make a serious statement about the future of the city or where I think it s headed Some of my inspiration for this future Toronto came from Toronto past It s hard to imagine that Ashbridges Bay was once a vast marsh and was some of the richest bird habitat on Lake Ontario Since the founding of Muddy York the marsh was gradually defiled by industry and the city s shoreline extended up to a kilometer in some places Maybe I was imagining some comeuppance for these transgressions on the birds and fish How did this future Toronto come into being I imagined it set 150 to 200 years from now I didn t decide on any one catastrophe having occured but perhaps a long period of general instability and decay followed by the beginnings of a renewal Obviously some kind of climate change has occurred though not of a nature expected by science A lot of people have understandably commented that the illustration is about global warming and rising ocean levels However Lake Ontario rising 30 feet is not considered a plausible climate change scenario Honestly it s just a fictional conceit that looks cool and opened up some fun possibilities for me to play with Who lives there There s clearly some kind of advanced civilization around with the power to convert the SkyDome into a giant greenhouse and build glassy domes into crumbling condo buildings One reason I added these sci fi elements was that early on in the process I d rendered the SkyDome fully in ruins and since it was so central to the composition destroying the stadium made the overall image feel much more grim than I wanted I was very conscious of balancing the apocalyptic with some kind of hopeful renewing force at work It was fun to sculpt concrete condo towers into unlikely shapes I imagined that these future people had a novel aesthetic sensibility and treated the ruins of today as a giant living sculpture garden They used special techniques to cultivate fruit trees in unlikely places and coated old concrete structures with smart materials to preserve them from further decay It s science fiction after all

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/12/17/issue-future-shoreline-toronto/ (2015-11-16)
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  • The stories behind 10 Spacing covers - Spacing Toronto
    the left of the SkyDome and the area surrounding the Air Canada Centre in the bottom right section ABOVE The seventh issue of Spacing fall 2006 featured our first and only tilt shift image It was the first of three covers photographed by Sam Javanrouh Toronto s and Canada s most popular photoblogger I accompanied Sam onto the roof of the Sheraton Centre across from City Hall The security guard who led us up to the roof said he d check on us in 30 minutes He was noticeably petrified of heights which explains why he never came back and let us run around on the roof for nearly three hours so we could take lots of other photos ABOVE The 11th issue of Spacing spring 2008 was the second time we used a photo from the Toronto Archives the first being our transit issue from summer 2006 The image fit so perfectly with our editorial content that we had to use it The cover also marks the first time I seriously covered up our logo while it was time consuming to individually crop out those people I love the depth effect it has with a few people standing behind letters ABOVE The 13th issue of Spacing fall 2008 winter 2009 featured our second photo gimmick cover the globe effect of Nathan Phillips Square and Toronto City Hall The photo by Sam Javanrouh was a great fit for our fifth anniversary issue which focused on creative new ideas for the city s public realm And since Toronto is often accused of thinking it is the centre of the universe the image of a planet Toronto seemed apt ABOVE The 17th issue of Spacing spring 2010 is one of my all time favourites Once we decided on the rules theme I instantly knew I d want to use the red No symbol in some form or fashion The public man figures were designed by Marc Ngui I moved and flipped the figures around endlessly trying to strike the right balance I know this is graphically the most striking cover we ve published I was on a streetcar heading home after work when I looked into a store and could easily read the words RULES on the magazine cover 30 or 40 feet away I also like how the cover kinda says Spacing Rules but has a cross through it as if we had second thoughts that we don t rule ABOVE The 18th issue of Spacing summer 2010 is the second chaos cover I designed the other being the urban animals cover I used a bit of poetic license with one of the photos along the bottom the G20 summit had yet to take place but I knew it would be a shit show The G20 cops were from the Pittsburgh summit the previous year My hunch proved to be quite accurate as our issue hit newsstands the week following Toronto s G20 riots This would possibly be one of those

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/12/13/stories-behind-10-spacing-covers/ (2015-11-16)
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