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  • Book Review - The West Coast Modern House - Spacing National
    now jeopardizes the fate of this important cultural landmark And so then it is no small coincidence that at the same time there has been a marked resurgence of interest in Vancouver s Modern residential architecture heritage first seen with the 2012 release of Coast Modern by local filmmakers Gavin Froome and Mike Bernard and most recently reaffirmed with a handsome new monograph The West Coast Modern House edited by Greg Bellerby former curator of the Charles H Scott gallery at Emily Carr University Published by Figure 1 known for their large format books on the visual and culinary arts this new edition is a sumptuous feast for the eyes with its 192 pages filled with numerous photographs on the subject With the support of the Canada Council of the Arts Christopher MacDonald and Jana Tyner have here provided poignant essays on the subject along with Bellerby who as well includes a 1947 essay written by none other than C E Ned Pratt One of the undisputed master builders of Vancouver s Modern post war era his work is included in the main body of the book alongside Ron Thom Arthur Erickson and Barry Downs all of whom cut their teeth working at his office of Thompson Berwick and Pratt The sepia toned photographs of the 53 selected houses many of which consist of modest light wood framing interspersed with poured concrete heavy timber structure and single glazed fenestration include many famous exemplars of the housing type starting with BC Binning s aforementioned house along with Arthur Erickson s first and second Smith houses As Christopher MacDonald points out in his essay the architects were often also their own client boldly exploring what at the time was uncharted territory using new building materials to construct their homes on pristine sites many located on the lower slopes of Vancouver s North Shore mountains As well as BC Binning s own home also featured are those of Ron Thom Zoltan Kiss Douglas Shadbolt Peter Oberlander and Barry Downs to name only a few In Ned Pratt s essay on the subject written in 1947 for the Journal of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada he observed at that time a tendency toward a more contemporary approach by the young architects of the day but noting the general public was resistant of this new aesthetic still wanting traditional looking houses despite their at times unsuitability for the Pacific west coast climate Prior to the war domestic architecture was in a rather sorry state The architectural styles ran from the Cottswold Cottages to the au moderne of the corner windows bulls eye windows etc The three popular styles were Tudor Cape Cod and Georgian and the architects that championed these three styles of course were famous and enjoyed a lucrative business This then was the situation that confronted the young and enthusiastic architect aspiring to persuade an unappreciative public to build in a more logical way As it turned out Pratt s essay was

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/national/2015/07/28/the-west-coast-modern-house/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Book Review - Twenty Buildings Every Architect Should Understand - Spacing National
    and are bookended by a thoughtful Introduction and Endword These are divided into subsections that generally make reference to the analytical framework of Analysing Architecture As is Unwin s trademark the book is filled solely with his incredible analytical drawings that speak directly to the content described According to Unwin the buildings included were chosen for their diversity of spaces and their differing suggestions about the relationship between architecture and the people As one can see from the following list of buildings in the book they do justice well to the authors words and offer readers an good variety of interesting selections Casa Del Ojo De Agua Ada Dewes and Sergio Puente Neuendorf House John Pawson and Claudio Silvestrin Barcelona Pavilion Mies Van Der Rohe Truss Wall House Kathryn Findlay and Eisaku Ushida Endless House Frederick Kiesler Farnsworth House Mies Van Der Rohe La Congiunta Peter Markli Un Cabanon Le Corbusier Esherick House Louis Kahn Maison À Bordeaux Rem Koolhaas Danteum Giuseppe Terragni Fallingwater Frank Lloyd Wright Villa Savoye Le Corbusier Kempsey Guest Studio Glenn Murcutt Condominium One The Sea Ranch Moore Lyndon Turnbull Whitaker Villa E 1027 Eileen Gray Church of St Peter Sigurd Lewerentz Villa Busk Sverre Fehn Villa Mairea Alvar Aalto Vals Thermal Baths Peter Zumthor Overall Twenty Buildings offers readers an excellent series of case study analyses that testify to the power of the analysis tools Unwin laid out in Analysing Architecture That being said through this book he also demonstrates that conceptual framework described in his earlier book does best when not used mindlessly as a checklist but instead as a method of getting into architectural analyses The themes of Analysing Architecture are within the description of each building but they are not solely described in those terms This fact strengthens the book by allowing readers who have not read his original book to gain just as much out of Twenty Buildings as those who have Of course given the strength of Unwin s initial book one would be wise to read it regardless If there is a way to make Twenty Buildings even stronger it would be to include a handful of vernacular architecture examples With the number of analyses Unwin has already done in other texts for example that of the Mud House and Llainfadyn buildings at the end of Analysing Architecture or his Skara Brae eBook one guesses that this would be an easy addition to the good range of well and lesser known architect design buildings already included Perhaps in a future edition Admittedly this is nitpicking Twenty Buildings Every Architect Should Understand is simply an excellent book Truly a perfect text for students of architecture and professionals alike or simply those interested in getting a taste of amazingly diverse language of architecture For more information visit the Routledge website Visit Simon Unwin s website to see all his books including his wonderful eBooks series You can also read the Spacing Vancouver review of Analysing Architecture here Erick Villagomez is one

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/national/2014/12/16/book-review-twenty-buildings-every-architect-understand/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Book Review - Twenty-Five Buildings Every Architect Should Understand - Spacing National
    case studies are from around the world including one from India Ramesh House Germany Mohrmann House and Brazil Bardi House The following is a complete list of houses included Casa Del Ojo De Agua Ada Dewes and Sergio Puente Neuendorf House John Pawson and Claudio Silvestrin Barcelona Pavilion Mies Van Der Rohe Truss Wall House Kathryn Findlay and Eisaku Ushida Endless House Frederick Kiesler Farnsworth House Mies Van Der Rohe La Congiunta Peter Markli Un Cabanon Le Corbusier Esherick House Louis Kahn Maison À Bordeaux Rem Koolhaas Danteum Giuseppe Terragni Fallingwater Frank Lloyd Wright Villa Savoye Le Corbusier Kempsey Guest Studio Glenn Murcutt Condominium One The Sea Ranch Moore Lyndon Turnbull Whitaker Villa E 1027 Eileen Gray Church of St Peter Sigurd Lewerentz Villa Busk Sverre Fehn Villa Mairea Alvar Aalto Vals Thermal Baths Peter Zumthor Ramesh House Liza Raju Subhadra Bardi House Lino Bo Bardi Vitra Fire Station Zaha Hadid Mohrmann House Hans Scharoun Bioscleave House Madeline Gins and Arakawa Over and above the new buildings there are some smaller changes that improve the original book These include an expansion of references as well as a slightly different layout structure that allows Unwin s wonderful analytical drawings to be larger Similarly where initially a series of quotes open each building analysis they are now distributed throughout their respective sections With respect to the quotes the original design was visually less obtrusive but if the latter is the price paid for more content and larger drawings I would say one still comes out well on top with the 2nd Edition As with his earlier book I do not hesitate to say that Twenty Five Buildings Every Architect Should Understand is simply an excellent book worthy of the bookshelves of students of architecture practicing professionals and architecture enthusiasts alike For more

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/national/2015/02/17/book-review-twenty-five-buildings-every-architect-understand/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Which Canadian Cities Are the Greenest and Why? - Spacing National
    Out of all 27 cities evaluated it ranked first in water management The city s water distribution leakage is only of 4 which is much better than the average 14 Also compared to the average 155 gallons of water consumed per person per year across Canadian cities Calgarians consume a mere 113 gallons of water on average The city still has to work on its air quality though and on its transportation system Ottawa 12 Our country s capital has a fairly decent green score Ottawa s most important green assets are its land use vast amount of green spaces and low population density its good public transit system used by 28 of workers more than double the 13 average and its low CO2 emissions On the not so bright side the capital does not have enough LEED certified buildings and should improve its environmental governance green action plans and management funding etc Toronto 9 The largest Canadian city did pretty well With 7 2 metric tons of CO2 released per person Toronto is comfortably below the 14 5 average Also Torontonians do not consume as much energy 40 gigajoules per person the average is 52 It is also worth mentioning that 44 of the Toronto waste is recycled while the average is 26 Like Ottawa Toronto is lacking in environmental governance and could raise its green rating by improving its land use Vancouver 2 Undoubtedly the greenest city in Canada and by far Vancouver is praised for the quality of its air ranked first in all 27 North American cities with 4 02 metric tons of CO2 emission per person its transportation system its land use 12 of the territory is green which is remarkable for a city with such high population density the management of its waste 55 of the municipal waste is recycled 26 is the average and its overall environmental governance For further information read the complete North American Green City Index here in PDF or check out the Green City Index Overview Julia Taylor is a writer globetrotter nature lover and cycling enthusiast who tries to fully appreciate every single thing life throws her way She works as a freelance blogger for Le Yeti a Montreal based bike dealer Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Book Review From the Stacks Seven Rules for Sustainable Communities Design Strategies for the Post carbon World Event Re Imagining Urban Form and Policy Symposium Call for Abstracts Accidental Parkland Toronto Ravine waterfront documentary 100in1day mapping event Urban forestry and the greening of Canadian cities Tweet More posts by Spacing 6 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Bruce Gavin Ward 2 years ago oops how tragically topical Calgary it ranked first in water management but indeed the water services in the green City brownProvince have done miracles to keep Calgarians able to stay hydrated through

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/national/2013/06/24/which-canadian-cities-are-the-greenest-and-why/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Looking to Norval Morrisseau's art to indigenize Canadian city planning (Part I) - Spacing National
    lines vivid colour palette and connected and unified shapes The use of the circle and its repetition at varying scales lured me in and there was something about this work that I connected with Until recently that was my only remembered moment with Morrisseau s work During my undergrad at the University of Victoria I spent the first two years in the History in Art program before switching to Social Sciences For the duration of my four years I was drawn more regularly to courses that spoke of indigenous arts and cultures becoming captivated by the legends fluidly embedded in each of the works One course in particular focused on indigenous arts of the northwest coast and I became familiar with the concept of the form line This use of the line particularly in Haida culture was used as a visual cue for connections and interrelationships The form line wove layered ideas of persons animals and spirits together symbolizing the unity and synthesis of all things This concept shattered my notion of what the line represented up until that point Art teachers had always taught me that lines were used to divide space and as soon as a blank canvas was marked with a paintbrush the one space that existed had now become two I had never known that spaces could actually exist within theses lines themselves The natural progression after doing an undergrad was to follow with a Masters which commenced two years later when I moved across the country from Victoria to Toronto to attend Ryerson in the School of Urban and Regional Planning Almost immediately I noticed the difference in visibility of indigenous peoples and their cultures in the City of Toronto as compared to Victoria I began to research the reasons behind the lack of awareness of Toronto s history with everyday people paired with the missing celebration of indigenous cultural identity throughout the streets of Toronto To my surprise I found that not only were many of the areas in and around Toronto inhabited by indigenous peoples before European settlers arrived as had happened on BC s coast but that the Urban Aboriginal population was and still is the youngest and most rapidly growing increasing by 31 from 2001 to 2006 Statistics Canada 2011 Even at a national scale over 50 of Aboriginal Canadians live in urban centres Muskrat Magazine 2012 which burst another misconception that most indigenous populations live in rural areas and remote communities and therefore do not need to be consulted with in an urban setting My next question then was Why is there no incentive to incorporate indigenous ways of knowing into the planning practice at an institutional level and why is the Urban Aboriginal population not readily engaged in the planning process Planning deals directly with land use redevelopment and ownership which also happens to be the foundational issue for Canadians continued struggle with understanding indigenous peoples rights and beliefs in Canada What do we do with the land The

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/national/2014/02/05/looking-norval-morrisseaus-art-indigenize-canadian-city-planning-part/ (2015-11-16)
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  • REID: Some thoughts on the 1 Bloor West proposal - Spacing Toronto
    from Yonge will happen I think the building is shoved to the immediate corner of the intersection because the tall buildings guidelines dictate a certain amount of space between buildings 12 5m In this case it would need to be this far from the Uptown condo on Balmuto Michael Black 8 months ago The proposed design of the wing is totally undistinguished Aside from sunlight considerations scrapping the wing will focus attention on the main Foster building which is one of the great architect s better designs Josh 8 months ago I d wager they re going to have a department store as part of the retail which makes the 8 storeys make sense Hudson s Bay at Yonge and Queen is 7 the new Holt Renfrew across the street from here looks to be around 7 storeys They could even get away with a flagship clothing retailer like TopShop filling in most of the space something like their Oxford Circus location I also think there s a certain fear of height in this article There are plenty of retail streets in New York which are fantastic and are surrounded by tall buildings Shady streets are not some horrible thing in summer people love the shade when it s 35 degrees out some even flock to it Not to mention Bloor will continue to be blast my lovely morning and evening light as the sun moves from East to West Selling off air rights seems problematic in that it encourages towers in low rise blocks Joanne 8 months ago Josh It s not a fear of heights in this article as you state its a fear of bad urban design as a result of the size of the buildings Mr Reid clearly states this Colin 8 months ago Cities shouldn t be planned around access to the sun Towers both give and take in this area A 6 storey building will completely block access to the sun in the winter as much as an 80 storey building would They also give sunlight my previously dark north facing apartment is completely illuminated by sunlight thanks to the new 1 Bloor development London Paris and Barcelona all wouldn t meet Toronto s sunlight guidelines yet somehow they re still sunny and amongst the most successful cities in the world Kevin Love 8 months ago My concern with this article is that it overlooks the tremendous benefits that we get with increased density There are ecological benefits by housing people car free downtown Economic benefits by creating housing retail and commercial space where people can come together and create a big expansion to one of the world s most productive economies Social benefits by providing huge tax revenues with very little additional infrastructure required The list goes on and on These benefits are why there should be a row of tall buildings all along Yonge street Yes some new infra is required The Yonge subway line is over capacity at peak hours We should have built the Relief Line 15 years ago But one of the world s most productive economies can easily afford to build that Our problems are political not economic Josh 8 months ago Joanne He s clearly arguing that an area of tall buildings is bad urban design due to poor access to sunlight New York as I pointed out is full of tall buildings is brilliantly successful and isn t perpetually in shade as this article would make it out to be The science he is selling is off base In June the sun would be nearly directly overhead and the shadows from even an 80 storey building fairly minimal In winter even the smallest of building would shade the entire street as the sun is much lower And even then the street still has access to sun in the mornings and evenings Dylan Reid 8 months ago It s not about fear of density or height it s about how that density and height is concentrated or balanced Of course sunlight not the only consideration but it is one of many considerations in urban planning there s a reason retail is more valuable on the sunnier side of a street If tall buildings are balanced by short ones around them and or open public spaces you can get more sunlight on the street than a row of mid rises You get density and height but also the benefits of variety That s the kind of considerations I m talking about Note also that Yonge St is nowhere near as wide as New York s north south avenues Setting the building back a bit from Yonge would bring it closer to the New York avenue scale Josh 8 months ago What I m saying is that the benefits of the variety are somewhat mute a 3 storey building will get you a negligible bit more sun than an 80 storey building will The sun we re actually talking about saving occurs somewhere between March and September between the hours of 11 and 2 It is really worth changing the urban environment for a small fraction of time Or should we really be putting density where transit and infrastructure merit it The building belongs right on Yonge along with every other building that s been built south of Bloor on Yonge Luke 8 months ago I m a bit confused Under your transferable air rights scheme would prospective developers only be able to purchase the rights from adjacent properties Could they purchase the air rights from more than one property I could foresee a situation where a developer would be motivated to purchase the rights from many properties creating high rise point towers on otherwise low to mid rise blocks which doesn t seem like progressive urban design to me With our very outdated zoning by laws developers would currently require the purchase of many air rights just to construct a building at densities appropriate at the intersection of

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/03/19/reid-some-thoughts-on-1-bloor-west/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Richard Andrew Sharum Q&A: picturing downtowns - Spacing Toronto
    a document of that particular space within that particular time Time as a tangible human idea is ever present in my mind while I m photographing It s almost a burden to realize that something as simple as a street corner can fundamentally change within a day And then the previous history of that particular space is changed forever I am trying to document these things as they relate to the human experience Spacing What would change if your subjects were aware of being photographed Sharum Some of them are aware Some of them aren t It s not something that I try to do when they are not noticing although it may seem like that There are many times when the subject sees me and notices that I am paying attention to them Through my basic body language which is slow and deliberate it is usually easy to understand that I am not a threat with a camera and they just continue as they are Most of the time no words are even spoken when we notice each other Metro Bar 2006 at 800 Main Street Dallas Provided photo Spacing Who does the art scene in Dallas exclude Sharum It seems that the local art scene here in Dallas tends to exclude any local talent that is trying to do something different What I mean by that is I have seen friends of mine who are great painters writers photographers etc that are not given any opportunity to express themselves as they would naturally because their particular style is not an easily marketable asset In other words if the gallery owners here don t think that they can sell your work they don t care even if what you are doing is different and deserves attention Many people like me have had to go elsewhere and get attention for our work I am more well known outside of my hometown then I am known within that hometown That is basically because I have not altered my work to fit the agenda of the gallery owners locally who are only concerned about turning over pieces on their walls Spacing Do you observe the same exclusion in Toronto Sharum I have not had enough time in Toronto to determine anything about the local arts scene But I can already tell you just from my few days of observation that Toronto has a much more vibrant public art scene than Dallas has ever had Spacing You ve been photographing downtowns since 2005 with your ongoing project In the Heart You re now turning some of those photographs into a book What keeps you coming back to these spaces Sharum Downtowns represent to me the epicenter of all modern civilization Part of the reason why I started this project and have traveled to many downtowns all over the world is to show that regardless of boundaries or distance all downtowns are generally the same In these spaces you usually find the most diverse

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/06/02/richard-andrew-sharum-qa-picturing-downtowns/ (2015-11-16)
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  • Good Reads: Winter Edition of Fort York’s newsletter Fife & Drum - Spacing Toronto
    edition of the Friends of Fort York s quarterly newsletter Fife and Drum was released recently It s been a busy season at the fort with the new visitors centre opening and ongoing fundraising efforts The articles in this latest edition include A piece on the new park that will open north of the Fort when the pedestrian cycling bridge is built Early Ikea The canvass houses used by the Simcoes when they first came to York Toronto A memory of a first visit to the fort by Spacing contributor Edward Keenan All free You can download a PDF of the current issue here But you can also go here to subscribe to Fife and Drum so it will arrive in your inbox Here you ll also find back issues of Fife and Drum to download Photos by Sid Calzavara joined by René Biberstein dTAH Fife Drum lists upcoming events and recent goings on at the fort but it also has since the Friends began publishing it in 1996 exhaustively researched essays and stories about the fort Toronto and related history I serve as volunteer director on the Friends of Fort York board the volunteer advocacy organization that has helped look after the interests of City of Toronto s premier museum site Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Good Reads Special Edition of Fort York s newsletter Fife Drum Good Reads Spring 2015 Edition of Fort York s newsletter Fife Drum Magna Carta special Fall 2015 Edition of Fort York s newsletter Fife Drum Good Reads Summer edition of the Friends of Fort York s Fife and Drum newsletter Tweet More posts by Shawn Micallef Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts The cold war siren system

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/toronto/2015/01/02/good-reads-winter-edition-fort-yorks-newsletter-fife-drum/ (2015-11-16)
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