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  • Tim Querengesser, Author at Spacing Edmonton
    Video Food Green Space Headlines History Housing Infrastructure Maps Media Neighbourhoods Parks Photos Politics Services Spacing Streetscape Traffic Transit Urban Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic By Tim Querengesser Bikes Four wild but cheap ideas Edmonton can introduce right now to protect cyclists Cycling in downtown Edmonton is a bit like jogging with bulls Each time you re nearly crushed riding atop your velo you wonder Read More Neighbourhoods Whither the urban car lot David Mussell the general manager of Don Wheaton Motors on Edmonton s Whyte Avenue says the tendency for car dealerships is to Read More Walking It s time to quit hating on pedways Pedways have been built in cities around the world for the same reason weather Most in places like Hong Kong Singapore and Taipei Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts Edmonton s urbanism headlines November 9 15 Induced Demand How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment Let it snow Winter and city building What do ETS riders need from a transit strategy Part 1 Why are Jasper and Whyte Ave 7 Lanes Wide From the Spacing Store 22 Buy yourself a subscription 22 Buy a

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/author/timquerengesser/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Whither the urban car lot? - Spacing Edmonton
    Wolfe assistant general manager with Edmonton Motors says a downtown car dealership no longer makes sense in Edmonton Wolfe a third generation descendent of F J Wolfe who founded Edmonton Motors in 1925 says motorists have by and large moved to the suburbs At one point in time it did make sense to have a dealership downtown when the downtown was the hub he says But today the average car buyer has no draw to come into the downtown other than to come into work It s an uphill battle to sell a vehicle in the downtown marketplace versus somebody that s in a residential area If I m going to leave work I m going to go home grab the kids and go car shopping as close as I can to my house When Edmonton Motors moved from downtown to Oliver in 1955 it was then on the outskirts of Edmonton Wolfe says The city has risen up all around it ever since and that has made life difficult for the dealership As far as the way it s going right now Edmonton s downtown is expanding Wolfe says With the land values the way they are there s two dealers left downtown We can t expand we have no place to go I m sitting on two acres and I need eight I m renting property and space in the Healy Building to store my units In 2008 a small church to the east of Edmonton Motors was knocked down and the company now rents the land But Wolfe says it s not enough There s no place to go downtown anymore and it s getting smaller If you take a look at what similar land is being used for it s for a high rise That s eventually what s going to have to happen Photo by Craig Moffat Photography CC BY NC ND But Will Wheaton sees the future of the urban car dealership differently Wheaton is the son of Don Wheaton Sr who died in 2012 whose iconic Chevrolet dealership has been on Whyte Ave since 1961 Wheaton says Don Wheaton Motors has learned to live with its space restrictions over the years yet concedes land costs are an issue To build a car dealership in a downtown location Wheaton says would be difficult today thanks to land scarcity And because car customers walk in and want a certain model in a certain colour right now space for inventory is a car dealership s most critical resource While Wheaton s flagship dealership on Whyte self conscious of its throwback vibe with its 1960s muscle cars in the indoor showroom and 1950 s stylized neon signs isn t going anywhere he says that s made possible in the same way that Wolfe does it through using car storage lots And later this year Sun Toyota a used car dealership that Wheaton owns on a less central area of Whyte Ave will retreat to a more suburban

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/04/22/whither-urban-car-lot/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Wayfinding in Edmonton is about to get easier - Spacing Edmonton
    Plan PDF contains a catalyst project called Green and Walkable Downtown that refers to a phased and coordinated program of street and public realm improvements focused on pedestrians It also highlights the notion of a wayfinding system Wayfinding refers to the system of visual cues such as signage and maps that people use to find destinations and navigate neighourhoods In the downtown context a coherent and effective wayfinding system is particularly important to pedestrians and cyclists The wayfinding signage that exists downtown today is inconsistent and in some cases incoherent or absent There is currently a patchwork of signage systems A Wayfinding System would include signage at street level for pedestrians Web and mobile phone based wayfinding tools could also be developed All components will be well integrated sharing a mutual look language and logic that will facilitate movement Edmonton s current wayfinding is a mess It s a mix of different approaches developed at different times with no coherent system or plan It s not just the pedway either it s everything I m really excited to see this start to change and just in time for what is perhaps the busiest construction period downtown has ever seen with the LRT arena Royal Alberta Museum and many other projects underway Good wayfinding is about to become more important than ever before This is just a first step and there s lots more that could be done I d love to see a digital component as well with a mobile site or apps or both Connections could be made to ETS wayfinding and of course we need to fix the pedway signage The City is running an online survey to gather feedback on the proposed maps and signs You have until May 4 to provide your input The first wayfinding

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/04/11/wayfinding-edmonton-get-easier/ (2015-11-17)
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  • It's time to quit hating on pedways - Spacing Edmonton
    transportation networks together make them work as a single network and thus to get the most from our investment What we need most is to turn our frustration with downtown vibrance away from the scapegoats and onto our streets The real culprit for our lame streets is the car or specifically streets designed for them to the near exclusion of other users If people do not like walking on your streets they won t It s as simple as that Tim Querengesser is a journalist and the head of The Edmonton Wayfinding Project Interior of Pacific Place Queensway Admiralty Hong Kong Photo Credit Dosdldyhai via Creative Commons Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Debunking Edmonton s War on Cars Look Both Ways Crosswalk design vs data What do ETS riders need from a transit strategy Part 1 Late Night Transit Service Essential for City s Ambitious Goals Tweet More posts by Tim Querengesser 10 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Scott Smith 2 years ago I m sorry but you can t compare Hong Kong and Edmonton and try to draw some parallels between the two cities pedway pedestrian culture Hong Kong is an incredibly dense and compact city Many of its residents live in tall apartment buildings not suburban detached houses Hong Kong has about 7 million people whereas Edmonton has 1 million Hong Kong has the highest rate of public transit use in the world with 90 of trips being on public transit Edmonton s transit ridership pales in comparison to that The important poing here is that Hong Kong s 7 million people are walking to and from transit stations Dense cities almost always have a strong walking culture simply because it is the most convenient way to get to and from where you are going whether its a neighborhood store or a transit station Installing pedways in Hong Kong would have a negligible impact on its streetlife There are 7 million people in Hong Kong with 90 of these people taking public transportation The vibrancy of their streets has been long established as the city s density promotes a pedestrian culture I do agree with you that the lack of pedestrians in Edmonton s downtown core is due to the legacy of auto oriented planning and building in the suburbs but it simply does not make sense to be comparing Hong Kong and Edmonton Hong Kong doesn t face the same issues Edmonton does in terms of enticing people to take up residency downtown Because of Hong Kong s density population size and the scale of the city people are walking Edmonton on the other hand is trying to encourage people to be using the sidewalks so it is certainly possible that pedways will remove people from the streets If there were more residents living in downtown Edmonton I would say that pedways wouldn t be harmful to street life but the density simply isn t there yet Tim Querengesser 2 years ago I agree Scott comparing Hong Kong and Edmonton is dubious and that is not the aim of this argument What I wanted to compare is the design and thinking that has gone into Hong Kong s pedways versus the lack of such things in Edmonton I also agree dense cities almost always have strong walking cultures but I disagree with the implication that this is so because it s the easiest way to get around Density makes getting around by car quite difficult but it also can make getting around by foot highly enjoyable and engaging if you design streets well And this is the part that applies to Edmonton If we don t put more thinking and effort into designing the parts of our infrastructure that pedestrians experience is it any wonder that we lack pedestrians and ultimately downtown vibrance Why do pedways in your view remove people from streets I see them adding people to streets in the winter If there was more to do in them and they worked better maybe even more people would take to their feet and use a pedway to move from point to point downtown rather than driving And I think the argument that pedways remove people from streets is empty anyway Streets remove people from streets Make a great street and people will walk on it Don t blame pedways for ruining the street Blame bad car centric design Scott Smith 2 years ago Hi Tim I agree with you that urban design shapes whether or not walking is a pleasant experience Arguably in North America walking concerns have been neglected for the last half century and Edmonton has is not unique in this respect The automobile has shaped Edmonton s planning and land use plans for far too long My concern is that without residential density to support a pedestrian presence downtown pedways will just further serve to keep people off the sidewalks Pedways are not inherently horrible urban design I just think that until Edmonton sees greater residential density downtown we should not embrace them You are absolutely right that we can address these issues through pedestrian oriented urban design but Edmonton still lacks a strong pedestrian presence downtown and a sophisticated pedway network will further serve to keep people off the streets In fact it reinforces the idea that walking outside is inconvenient and an unpleasant experience Also I think we have to distinguish between subway connecting pedways and overhead street pedways Subway pedways are part of a city s underground transit network Edmonton s transport system is not as complicated as large cities like Chicago NYC etc Edmontonians don t have to change subway lines I admit it is quicker convenient and more pleasurable to stay underground to transfer subway lines In fact in Vancouver transferring from Granville stop millennium line to City Center Canada

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/02/27/time-quit-hating-pedways/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Induced Demand: How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment - Spacing Edmonton
    traffic congestion due to the phenomenon of induced demand Induced demand describes a situation where increasing the supply or capacity of roadway decreases the time cost of driving causing more people to drive and consequently eliminating any short term reductions in congestion This fact has been recognized in a number of studies most notably in a landmark study by Duranton Turner at the University of Toronto The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion Evidence from US cities This study concluded that increased provision of interstate highways and major urban roads is unlikely to relieve congestion of these roads So what about LRT The Southeast portion of the Valley line travels along 75th Street between Whitemud Drive and Wagner Road before veering west to 83rd Street The Valley Line will cost a reported 1 8 billion A report to City Council s Transportation Committee suggests that roadways along this line will operate with increased delays reduced auto levels of service and that the LRT will advance the auto impacts in the short term However in the long term it is not inconceivable that the increased time cost would push some auto commuters to the LRT This is something the report does not acknowledge My question is if the city is investing so much in LRT why are we talking about making it easier for people to continue driving In Jeff Speck s latest book Walkable City he explains how removing vital arteries rather than creating congestion actually has the effect of removing traffic from our streets He calls this effect reduced demand While this is likely not a realistic or prudent option for 75th Street a good compromise would be to keep 75th Street to its current configuration of four lanes With increased emphasis on LRT investment in Edmonton it is important

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/03/19/induced-demand-edmonton-can-undermine-lrt-investment/ (2015-11-17)
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  • 50 Years of Sport: The Jasper Place Sports Centre - Spacing Edmonton
    approximately 770 000 and was largely a joint venture between the Town Jasper Place Composite High School and St Francis Xavier High School Programming in the early years was more or less a 50 50 split between dedicated access for the schools and open access for community users This is a similar agreement to that currently in place between the City and St Francis Xavier High School with respect to programming the new St Francis Xavier Sports Centre Upon its opening the Jasper Place Sports Centre was considered a cutting edge facility featuring modern architecture and innovations that pushed the envelope of engineering and recreation facilities design The pool was considered a marvel of engineering at the time boasting the largest concrete thin shell roof in Canada Its five metre diving platform was the highest in any municipally owned pool in the province A small fitness centre occupies the space that formerly accommodated seating for 250 spectators While the pool no longer hosts dive competitions it continues to play a key role in the development program for the Edmonton Keyano Swim Club this despite the fact that the pool is only 23 metres long Jasper Place Fitness Leisure Centre Photo Credit K Witiw The original concept for the arena was changed after concerns were raised about the potential detrimental effects that its large plain appearance would have on housing to the east across 163 rd Street The solution devised by the architects was to depress the ice surface 12 feet below grade and give the roof an undulating design Accumulating garbage in an open space under the arena s wooden seats led the Edmonton Fire Department to threaten the facility with demolition in 1978 The concern here was that a smoldering cigarette butt could posed a significant fire hazard A recent three year renovation completed in 2010 ensures that it will continue to be considered one of the premier and most used arenas in the City Bill Hunter Arena Photo Credit K Witiw Jasper Place was known derisively as Mud City through much of its history due to its notorious unpaved streets However the soil proved useful when building the stadium The playing field was surfaced with excess dirt from the Town s road paving program So much dirt was available in fact that a small tobogganing hill was constructed to the southeast of the stadium In 2010 the field s natural playing surface was replaced with artificial turf Mural on the east wall of the Jasper Place Bowl Photo Credit K Witiw Only one year after its opening the Jasper Place Sports Centre hosted Jasper Place and City of Edmonton delegates to celebrate the Town s amalgamation Since that time the City s population has more than doubled and mega facility projects have by far eclipsed the Jasper Place Sports Centre in size and scope Despite the supposed allure of mega facilities what is most attractive about the facilities at Johnny Bright Sports Park is that they are built

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2013/08/01/50-years-of-sport-the-jasper-place-sports-centre/ (2015-11-17)
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  • sam singh, Author at Spacing Edmonton
    Housing Infrastructure Maps Media Neighbourhoods Parks Photos Politics Services Spacing Streetscape Traffic Transit Urban Design Walking Waterfront Region Topic By sam singh Architecture Brutalism s Renaissance Brutalism took centre stage a few days ago in Edmonton with a visit by professor Robert Bruegmann from the University of Illinois at Read More Community Towers of Babel Pax Ethnica Where and How Diversity Succeeds Author Karl E Meyer and Shareen Blair Brysac Perseus Books 2012 Can t we all Read More Traffic Paved with good intentions Changing Lanes Visions and Histories of Urban Freeways Authors Joseph F C DiMento and Cliff Ellis The MIT Press To urbanist Read More Maps Book Review On the Map On The Map A Mind Expanding Exploration of the Way the World Looks Author Simon Garfield Gotham Books 2013 Maps show us where Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts Edmonton s urbanism headlines November 9 15 Induced Demand How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment Let it snow Winter and city building What do ETS riders need from a transit strategy Part 1 Why are Jasper and Whyte Ave 7 Lanes Wide From the Spacing Store 22

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/author/samsingh/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Making Infill Go Boom - Spacing Edmonton
    amended to include a provision for Permit Ready developments That coma inducing sentence means that with the appropriate criteria met applicants were able to select a home design purchase the plans for a reasonable price and begin building with blinding speed This all sounds quite delightful but after some poking around I have come across a number of ways that this program may be more effectively implemented here First off Portland s program was suspended in 2011 after contract limitations In addition only two house plans were ever approved by Portland s city council as permit ready in spite of the numerous ideas found in the Portland Catalogue of Narrow House Designs Lastly permit ready housing approvals were only made available where sites were already vacant An adapted program in Edmonton could build on this approach as a means of encouraging the development of entry level housing options in older areas particularly given the might of 50 foot lot subdivisions that are now possible Permit ready designs would undoubtedly help mitigate some financial risk for infill developers vastly reducing permitting times and the nail biting uncertainty of standard requests for relaxations of bylaw requirements A faster turnaround time on projects equals dollars and cents for builders and buyers alike with minimal cost to the City Of course at this point I am strongly motivated by a rather dire shared laundry scenario in a shady low rent apartment And even if my bias is showing I can t help but think that a little flexibility would go a long way to making our infill neighbourhoods more accessible to those who want to be there Design concept from the Portland Catalogue of Narrow House Designs Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Schools and Parks II A History of Segregation What do ETS riders need from a transit strategy Part 1 Nîkânîw Edmonton s Aboriginal Youth Leadership Program Update Re imagining Downtown Public Event and Voting Tweet More posts by Peter West 8 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Louis Pereira 2 years ago Great read I ve followed the Portland program for years Even created my own version here re in Edmonton Glenora of all places http www houzz com projects 27292 LG Houseplaces We re currently working Tegan and Paul at RedBrick so there s something on the horizon for you and a lot others who are looking for solutions Louis Pereira thirdstone inc Peter West 2 years ago Thanks Louis I m a big fan of your pad it is absolutely stunning and the gold standard for narrow lot design in Edmo I am delighted to hear that you have another development on the horizon Jason 2 years ago Nicely written As a native Edmontonian who relocated back here after 10 years in Vancouver I definitely echo the sentiments about lack of variety and bad

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2013/10/02/making-infill-go-boom/ (2015-11-17)
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