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  • Moving beyond #OpenArtYEG - Spacing Edmonton
    In this instance Rauch is asking people who happen upon street art in Edmonton to send a geotagged photograph to Open Art Edmonton via Twitter email or even snail mail the details are here If you are inclined to Tweet or email there are several pieces of technology that come together in your smart phone to enable your contribution Specifically a network connect WiFi or some variety of cell connection coupled with a quality camera and a GPS allow a contributor to geotag a photo and send it to the map It just so happens that smart phone tools are an urbanest dream and have the potential to map far more than art For instance Crowdmap the mapping platform that Open Art is running on is a simplified deployment of Ushahidi which was developed in Kenya in 2008 to help document Government incited violence It has been deployed around the world to map violence in its many forms as well as map a variety of other development and planning needs OpenPlans a New York City based company supports crowd sourced contributions on street safety infrastructure and bike sharing NY is shifting part of it s public consultation another word for crowd sourcing requirements on line as a means of capturing a wider and more varied demographic than those who show up for a traditional face to face consultation meeting These examples of crowd sourcing are deeper than mapping art and show the potential next steps in developing a public consultation strategy that leverages the power of a smart phone in an engaged citizen s pocket Code for America CfA is leading the way with this brand of citizen engagement TransitMix a new tool recently launched by CfA allows citizens to plan the transit routes that they would like to see

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/10/21/moving-beyond-openartyeg/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Why should open data matter to Edmonton? - Spacing Edmonton
    community Format is important Data shared through closed formats such as PDFs cannot be easily imported into software that can analyze or visualize it Given that the data is the starting point upon which good analysis is built being able to manipulate the data is vital Through analysis comes understanding and communication and that requires some sort of interface from something as simple as an article to more complex such as an app When it comes to content an open data portal is only as good as the data available If only soft data is released data that does not contribute to a narrative or somehow empower citizens i e does that data make those in government uncomfortable then the most important data that citizens should see is being repressed For Edmonton this is important for two reasons First we have an engaged citizenry who are interested in a wide range of policies from the downtown arena to bike lanes to budget allocations Second the City of Edmonton has been criticized for implementing inadequate public consultation plans By posting on line and in an open format the data that underlies any given policy the City is creating a more inclusive process Normal citizens and experts alike can examine comment on and criticize the rational for the policy of the day And this is where community comes into play This is a tall order and currently unrealistic to expect citizens to engage with data at the analysis and app development level Enter the so called hackers Hackers provide an intermediate step between the data and citizens They work to develop either alone or better yet with content experts such as researchers planners or even accountants applications or evaluations of the data for citizens The end result can be wide ranging For example an app like Vancouver s Recollect that reminds people when to put out the trash or the Guardian Newspaper reporting on British Government spending Both the app and the reporting provide a service to citizens based on open data In addition to making iPad apps the open data community should also act in the capacity of activists to lobby for more and better data and to increase the ability of an average citizen to think critically about and work with data After all it is inevitable that the data the City of Edmonton collects stores and uses will become more important as a policy tool As citizens we should understand what is being used and how Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Related Posts Bike Collisions in Edmonton Tweet More posts by Matthew Dance 2 comments Neither the author nor Spacing necessarily agrees with posted comments Spacing reserves the right to edit or delete comments entirely See our Comment Policy Jason 1 year ago Very relevant As I am interested in mapping a friend of mine who is a GIS whiz and myself had the idea to plot the relationship of transit stops with a

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/06/26/open-data-matter-edmonton/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Place Identity and Public Consultation - Spacing Edmonton
    of self or identity A place is comprised of its physical characteristics the activities that occur there and the meanings derived thereof Place is important to how we see ourselves our community and our city The notion of place identity has profound implications for how urban planners consult on growth and development within our city It points to the need for both a broad i e a wide cross section of people and deep i e seeking the depth of knowledge of individuals consultation With the Communities on Foot program the City of Edmonton completed a broad and deep consultation to construct unique community walking maps To understand how they built their consultation process I contacted Ian Hosler with the City of Edmonton Community Services He said in different formats we ask the citizens who live in the neighbourhood who are the content experts two main questions 1 I f someone moved in next door where would you tell them are the interesting places to walk to 2 Or where are the pleasant routes if you want to go for a walk Hosler goes on to say that We make it clear we aren t looking for the obvious playgrounds and parks as we have that information but what are the things you wouldn t see on a typical City map Acknowledging citizens as place based content experts seems to be a departure from current development thinking but is deeply rooted in place based geographic theory see Kevin Lynch s The Image of the City published in 1960 In this instance the City used a range of consultation formats from approaching schools with the goal of engaging children in the conversation to traditional planning charrettes in order to gather place based content The end product the Community Walking Maps demonstrate the depth of place based understanding that can be gleaned from citizens For instance the Parkallen walking map shows a Monkey Tree on the south end of the Elementary School yard Hostler said that the knowledge of this tree emerged in talking with school aged children The Monkey Tree is a special place for kids who attend the Parkallen school Snapshot of the Parkallen Walking Map Via City of Edmonton It is clear that the Community Walking Maps are built by seeking a wide range of input from a variety of citizens who express a deep understanding of place As Hosler says we hear amazing stories and facts that may or may not be able to be incorporated in the map These stories are reflected in the detail and range of meaning expressed on the walking maps I suggest that you look them up Consultation that is meaningful that represents a shift from looking for buy in for a specific project to defining the scope of place based attributes that are meaningful can be a powerful approach to achieve citizen engagement Recognizing that citizens have expert knowledge of their community can help improve the success of a project not least

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/06/12/place-identity-public-consultation/ (2015-11-17)
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  • New Infill Action Plan Released - Spacing Edmonton
    New Infill Action Plan Released June 3 2014 By Paul Giang via City of Edmonton Subscribe to Mag Share Post Tweet Post Buy Merch andise Tweet More posts by Paul Giang Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts Edmonton s urbanism headlines November 9 15 Induced Demand How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment Let it snow Winter and city building What do

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/06/03/new-infill-action-plan-released/ (2015-11-17)
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  • The Edmonton Streetcar & Its Urban Form: Part 2 - Spacing Edmonton
    the above street section is seen in a side by side width comparison with images following it is readily apparent historic streetcar streets such as Alberta Avenue are comparatively narrow 1 2 storey buildings on either side of the street form a streetwall and spatially define it Building variety materials and landscape details contribute to place Crossing and jaywalking are common because it is easy relatively safe and quick to reach a destination on the opposite side Shops provide numerous finger thawing locations on frigid days Windows abutting the sidewalk perform a safety function surveillance has proven to alleviate both real and perceived danger Auto Primary Commercial Arterial Post 1950 Commercial transit arterials during the transition from streetcar to automobile also reflect a compromise between modes The obvious observation here is the space required for cars To accomodate storefront parking the window to window width is over triple that of the streetcar arterial Sidewalk pedestrians are between parked and moving cars instead of window shopping in this section The sense of space is lost and the functional crossing width erodes walkability and attractiveness Auto Dedicated Arterial Contemporary Further in the evolution to private automobile dominance public life streets disappear in favour of roads the main purpose is carrying vehicles at great distances most efficiently While the pedestrian experience may not be the last thought in auto dedicated arterial roadways it is far from the first Sidewalks are provided but pedestrians walk here more by necessity than incentive There are few reasons to linger aside from an interest in traffic gazing from the odd park bench provided Residential layouts rightfully turn their back yards on these roads with a noise and visual screening fence emphasizing a disengagement from public street life that older designs once inspired Everyone who has lived in Edmonton long enough has been down this ubiquitous road many times before Transit Arterial Contemporary Future What about the streets of our planned future If the question is how do we again design attractive and walkable streets the answer decisively includes transit purely based on space demands The type urban design and integration with suitable surrounding land uses will determine success Recently planned and constructed LRT routes illustrated above in future Bonnie Doon have typically included expropriation of land and widening road right of ways to accommodate tracks and station platforms while maintaining all automobile lanes Trains travel at relatively high speeds with great distance between stops meaning little opportunity for integration with the surrounding land uses between stops The effect is that development influence in this respect is limited to distinctly separated nodes Malls like Southgate are easy targets for transit stops and redevelopment and clusters of density in large scale projects like Century Park are more probable The streetcar on the other hand travelled slower and stopped frequently The integration with the surrounding landscape was higher and reflected the nature of streetcar streets as linear interconnected public spaces Development pressures were not limited to specific transit nodes and

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/09/24/the-edmonton-streetcar-its-urban-form-part-2/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Jason Pfeifer, Author at Spacing Edmonton
    an interdisciplinary designer and photographer with a background in architectural and communication design He is specifically interested in design decisions that are made or aren t made and the profound effect they can have on outcomes in communities He s a graduate of UBC s Environmental Design program in the school of Architecture and Landscape Architecture and holds a diploma in Digital and Interactive Media Design Transit The Edmonton Streetcar Its Urban Form Part 2 Some time ago now I wrote Part 1 of The Edmonton Streetcar and its Urban Form In it I identified that Edmonton s favourite Read More Neighbourhoods The Edmonton Streetcar and Its Urban Form Part 1 Jasper Avenue Whyte Avenue 124th Street Alberta Avenue 95th Street 97th Street 109th Street What do all of these streets share Read More Infrastructure The Scale of Two Cities Edmonton and Manhattan It s no secret that Edmonton has a reputation for low density development There is a lot of Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts Edmonton s urbanism headlines November 9 15 Induced Demand How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment Let it snow Winter and city building

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/author/jasonpfeifer/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Design and the City: The LRT and the 'Flying E' - Spacing Edmonton
    and Montréal Métro signage Photo credit Cindy Andrie 2006 Matthieu Tremblay 2007 A public transit identity is a storyteller Iconic public transit identities such as the Montréal Métro s downward arrow or the London Underground s roundel have transcended their roles as station indicators to become vital components of their respective cities visual landscapes Embedded in these logos are a myriad of personal and civic histories from the Blitz in London to Expo67 in Montréal and a sense of place reflecting the unique design language of each city TransLink s T signage at Yaletown Roundhouse station Vancouver Photo credit Stephen Rees 2010 A public transit identity is a wayfinder Providing attractive and distinct transit signage assists residents and visitors in finding their way to the attractions services and employment that congregate in the city In anticipation of the tourism influx for the 2010 Winter Olympics Vancouver s transit authority redesigned its system wide transit signage to provide a visual touchstone for tourists unfamiliar with the city allowing them to efficiently find their way to venues entertainment and accommodations throughout the Vancouver area using public transit Existing LRT logo at Bay Enterprise Station 104th Street and Jasper Avenue Photo credit Mack Male 2011 A public transit identity is accessible Signage at LRT stations in Edmonton is often excessively detailed visually busy inconsistent and not to be understood quickly In short it is many things that signage should not be Differentiating LRT signage from its wheeled counterpart is important in not only communicating the difference in travel options and experiences but also increasing visibility for transit users with low visual acuity A public transit identity is attractive Do car manufacturers use an icon of a car to market themselves Horses stars and abstract letterforms are icons of choice In Edmonton an LRT is an LRT In addition to the level of accessibility reliability and customer service a transit authority must ensure to retain existing customers and attract new users public transit should also be presented as something unique interesting and visually welcoming A public transit identity is an ambassador As the LRT system expands to serve the growing population and appetite for alternative methods of transport in the city it is important the system have a strong visual identity to distinguish itself from other transit agencies and travel modes in the region One that is distinctly Edmontonian Given these requirements where could ETS turn to develop a new visual identity for its LRT service To its archives ETS flying E logo used from 1976 until the current identity system replaced it in 1997 can still be found on many of the original Siemens U2 trains and on old signage throughout the downtown pedway system As these trains and signs are retired and replaced we will lose the icon Yet the 1976 logo is a design success a striking implication of modernity direction and speed More importantly it is one unique to Edmonton and is deserving of a better fate than that of

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/2014/03/06/design-city-lrt-flying-e/ (2015-11-17)
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  • Jeff Robson, Author at Spacing Edmonton
    City The LRT and the Flying E What contributes to the image of a city Is it the rich manufacturing heritage on 104th Street The vibrancy of Old Strathcona I can Read More Search Advertisement Spacing Magazine fall 2015 Order issue Subscribe In these stores Popular Posts Edmonton s urbanism headlines November 9 15 Induced Demand How Edmonton Can Undermine Its LRT Investment Let it snow Winter and city building

    Original URL path: http://spacing.ca/edmonton/author/jeffrobson/ (2015-11-17)
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