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  • about leadership particularly that it s a responsibility that requires commitment and hard work What really builds character is the ability to emulate successful leaders They ll see the kind of strengths of character that these leaders have said Ken Hardy Professor Emeritus and creator of Learning From Leaders I wanted to expose the students to excellent examples of leadership so they ll get a framework for how to prepare themselves for leadership I want them to pursue leadership Since the inception of the course in the fall of 2008 leaders from a wide range of fields and with varying levels of experience have visited the class Examples include James Irving President and CEO of the New Brunswick business dynasty J D Irving Limited Shelly Jamieson Secretary of the Cabinet and Head of the Ontario Public Service who was recently inducted into the Canada s Most Powerful Women Top 100 Hall of Fame William T Brock Retired Deputy Chairman TD Bank Financial Group and his wife Ann and Donald K Johnson a Canadian philanthropist and senior adviser to BMO Capital Markets The course borrows elements from Inside The Actors Studio the former long running Bravo television series that offered in depth interviews and often startling revelations about some of the biggest celebrities Professor Hardy aims to capture that insider component by asking the guest leaders to discuss their biggest trials and errors What I appreciate most is these leaders tell everything they ll tell about the hardships and the heartaches as well as all the successes It s all done in this confidential trust environment he said Part of the giving in this climate is they can tell about their mistakes The students need to know that everybody makes mistakes If you have the freedom to make mistakes you can

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/research/featured-faculty/ken-hardy.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • Zbaracki studied the ferry industry before during and after the sinking of the ferry Estonia on the Baltic Sea on September 28 1994 which killed 852 people This was the largest peacetime marine disaster in Europe since the famous Titanic incident After more than 800 000 successful ferry trips on the Baltic Sea the Estonia tragedy served as a wake up call that accidents occur when you least expect them if you don t keep an eye on looming risks There are millions of sailings that are successful with no accidents and no deaths and then suddenly there is this one event where 852 people die at once in one setting They took their eyes off safety so that s a significant problem said Zbaracki There s a strong signal that this is a very profitable industry and some weak signals about safety That s the interesting problem how do you pay attention to really weak signals in light of really strong signals Our research raises important questions about managing risk in the face of multiple goals such as growth profits and safety While risk management tends to be high in organizations that engage in high risk activities such as flying airplanes fighting forest fires climbing mountains launching space shuttles and managing nuclear weapons it s seen to a lesser degree in organizations operating in traditionally low risk settings However recent events such as the listeriosis outbreak affecting Maple Leaf Foods raise important questions about protecting the public interest in even low risk settings such as the food chain or the ferry industry Because they re traditionally low risk settings we tend to think they are safe so we don t worry We get a distorted sense of what might actually happen said Zbaracki In fact according to the research the Estonia tragedy was related to design flaws and operational errors known prior but kept private Sharing that knowledge industry wide might prevent similar incidents The airline industry is a prime example of how being proactive can pay off Any near accidents are carefully scrutinized to determine the cause and that information is distributed industry wide not just to the airline in jeopardy If you go back to the 1930s the airline industry was a really risky industry where planes were crashing on a regular basis Now flying is safer than driving said Zbaracki The airline industry focuses not just on failures but on near failures and a reliable understanding is then distributed throughout the industry According to Zbaracki when managing risks scale and complexity need to be considered For instance a listeria contamination at Maple Leaf Foods has a huge impact because the company distributes products across the country A similar incident at a small local butcher shop may not have such drastic effects The BP oil spill disaster is an example of where the scale was extraordinary This is where the interesting leadership questions come in because the population that is affected is a lot broader and people

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/research/featured-faculty/mark-zbaracki.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • we re developing it becomes problematic Crossan s research on what constitutes character strengths is anchored on the work of Peterson and Seligman who attribute six virtues to character strengths wisdom courage humanity justice temperance and transcendence These virtues typically prompt certain behaviours For instance courage might be connected with perseverance and a sense of integrity Although such virtues can be developed she warns it s a tall order It s not something you would read about and then develop character You need experience over time to develop character Crossan said Educational institutions need to be more mindful of the processes and the experiences that they re offering students and take into account how they might foster or undermine character The case method that Ivey has been using for almost 90 years is already an effective means to develop character in the classroom because it encourages deep discussion of various courses of action and potential outcomes Role playing narratives mentor relationships and collaborative learning techniques may also help with moral reasoning and character development said Crossan Business schools can also integrate character development into traditional courses For instance a strategy course could incorporate reaction papers to heated case debates where students reflect on how their personal values beliefs or attitudes affected the way they approached the ethical issues to hone character strengths of perspective and self regulation Crossan has also created a Virtue Based Orientation model that brings together certain virtues values and character strengths that may help during decision making What tends to guide people at business schools is really a basic cost benefit analysis As long as there is a value for the shareholders a decision is fine she said If we root that in a more virtues based orientation to decision making then we begin to anchor these decisions around things that are stable for a longer period of time It puts the onus back on individuals to think through decisions in a more clear minded way than they would have if they re simply looking at shareholder value or using a cost benefit analysis approach Another critical aspect of character development is self reflection when making decisions One of the things that we often find with individuals is they only learn under duress under really significant situations where their backs are up against the wall Crossan said When it comes to leadership activities you often don t have things hitting you over the head as this is a significant decision or serious situation There are much often more subtle signals so the capacity for awareness and self reflection has to be much more nuanced than many leaders have currently developed Crossan and her colleagues are working on developing teaching materials and experiences that will help students deepen their character strengths For example they have been working with the fire department to develop simulations that will help students understand how character strengths of courage wisdom humility and prudence must work together to support the technical competencies that

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/research/featured-faculty/mary-crossan.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • do business in the long term Additionally product harm crises have been on the rise due to increasingly stringent product safety regulations higher consumer demands and complex supply chains where multiple suppliers are contributing parts to the final product without necessarily bearing responsibility for the end product Certain industries such as children s products pharmaceuticals and automobiles are more strictly regulated and therefore more prone to product recalls In fact Dawar said in some years more automobiles are recalled than sold That said Dawar said some crises are more damaging for brands than others if they involve the brand s core positioning For example Gatorade s key proposition is rehydration while Tropicana purports freshness so if either of the brands rehydration properties were questioned it would hurt Gatorade more than Tropicana However if freshness were the issue the Tropicana brand would be more severely damaged The recent BP oil spill is a case in point where the brand s positioning Beyond Petroleum was a risk factor he said BP emphasized its friendliness toward the environment over the past decade but when it s extracting and transporting that much oil there is bound to be a spill at some point To position yourself on the proposition that you are entirely environmentally friendly in such a high risk industry is setting yourself up to fail Dawar said So brands can choose positions that are less risky or more risky and it is that positioning that will affect how they will respond in a crisis how consumers will respond to a crisis and how consumers will change their perceptions of the brand after a crisis The good news is damage control is possible According to Dawar firms that go into a crisis with a positive reputation do better regardless of their response to the crisis than firms that did not have those positive expectations going into the crisis To some extent a positive prior reputation acts as an insurance policy in case of crisis it buffers the negative impact of the crisis he said He also cites three common mistakes that firms make and gives advice on what to do instead Managers respond to the crisis as opposed to customers and end up managing the crisis rather than managing the brand for the long term He advises firms to build their reputations and sustain their reputations long before a crisis occurs If they ve not invested in brand building and communicated their core messages and their positioning to their audiences they will be perceived as a blank slate during the crisis and consumers regulators and other entities will write what they want on that blank slate during the crisis Dawar said That s not the climate where you want them writing on that blank slate Firms delay responding to the public This can be perceived as stonewalling even if they re just trying to pull together the information or focus on making sure the crisis doesn t get out of hand Dawar suggests

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/research/featured-faculty/niraj-dawar.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • Institute for Leadership Cases Text size Ian O Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership About Research Cases Teaching News Events Conferences Blog Videos Contact Us Cases Enbridge Michigan Oil Spill Patrick Daniel s Challenge Oct 24 2012 In 2010 approximately 20 000 barrels of oil being shipped south by Enbridge spilled into Michigan s Talmadge Creek contaminating wetlands around Battle Creek and the nearby county seat of Marshall including a stretch of the Kalamazoo River The timing of the incident could not have been worse The pipeline had been carrying controversial tar sands oil at a time when Enbridge and its competitors were seeking to greatly expand their pipeline networks across North America Moreover the pipeline failure came on the heels of BP s much larger oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico amid a period of heightened public intolerance toward oil spills As a result Enbridge faced massive public relations PR and regulatory challenges Enbridge s reputation was clearly at risk since the company had promoted itself as a true believer in corporate social responsibility which had raised the stakes when dealing with the industrial accident The CEO of Enbridge faced an almost impossible challenge He needed to prove to American citizens and to industry regulators market watchers company shareholders and Enbridge employees that his company deserved to be judged on its own merits not as a Canadian version of BP To meet this challenge he needed to demonstrate that Enbridge was run by people who not only wanted to make amends but could be trusted to do so Purchase Case and or Related Products Share Follow Us Ivey Publishing Search Ivey Cases Leadership Processes Leadership Skills and Values Change Management Talent Management and Leadership Succession Leading In Times of Crisis Building High Performance Teams Responsible Leadership Motivating People Ivey Research

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/cases/articles/enbridge-a.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • in Ivey Ivey Trading Company Contact Us FAQ For Recruiters Ivey Ian O Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership Cases Text size Ian O Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership About Research Cases Teaching News Events Conferences Blog Videos Contact Us Cases Scotiabank Collaboration Across Business Lines Oct 18 2012 On October 1 2010 Scotiabank implemented changes to its organizational structure that realigned its business globally and positioned it for further growth Under the new structure the bank s businesses were regrouped into four business lines Canadian Banking International Banking Global Banking and Markets and Global Wealth Management The bank had to figure out how to help individuals improve on working together across business lines The formalization of cross collaboration was through the newly instituted leadership teams Team members had a joint accountability to ensure that the bank achieved optimum results in the geographic region in which the leadership team operated And it was up to the team to consider how it was going to leverage collaboration These teams were a significant departure from the behaviours and activities expected only a few months ago people reported up to their own business line and did not worry about what anyone else in the particular geographic market was doing There had been anecdotal evidence that a number of the leadership teams had success during the first few months Still the sentiment among the senior leaders of the bank was that the implementation of the leadership teams was associated with several challenges Purchase Case and or Related Products Share Follow Us Ivey Publishing Search Ivey Cases Leadership Processes Leadership Skills and Values Change Management Talent Management and Leadership Succession Leading In Times of Crisis Building High Performance Teams Responsible Leadership Motivating People Ivey Research Database Search All Articles Latest Video Crisis and Communication Feb 10 2011 Peter

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/cases/articles/scotiabank-collaboration.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • Ivey Trading Company Contact Us FAQ For Recruiters Ivey Ian O Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership Cases Text size Ian O Ihnatowycz Institute for Leadership About Research Cases Teaching News Events Conferences Blog Videos Contact Us Cases The Christchurch Earthquake and Crusaders Rugby Sep 17 2012 On February 2011 a large earthquake hit Christchurch New Zealand causing loss of life The Crusaders a major sports franchise headquartered in Christchurch must plan for the season given that its facility has been extensively damaged and the season has already commenced The franchisee board managers coaches and players have to deal with this catastrophe and build morale in the community by deciding what to do The case examines the processes of decision making and the participative nature of decisions involving players as well as management The case examines the key role that leadership and character play in contingency and scenario planning Purchase Case and or Related Products Share Follow Us Ivey Publishing Search Ivey Cases Leadership Processes Leadership Skills and Values Change Management Talent Management and Leadership Succession Leading In Times of Crisis Building High Performance Teams Responsible Leadership Motivating People Ivey Research Database Search All Articles Latest Video Crisis and Communication Feb 10

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/cases/articles/christchurch-earthquake.htm (2013-06-03)
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  • Contact Us Cases Training and Development at RVA A Nonprofit Organization Jul 10 2012 The case is about a non profit organization located in Manchester England As a regional association helping smaller voluntary organizations and groups survive and grow the organization itself depends on fundraising and donations and runs on project based funding The projects normally run for three to five years Hiring and training new employees every two to three months is common Due to project timelines employees leave as soon as they find another job Many complain about the lack of development opportunities within the organization The chief executive officer has seven people working for him and needs to make a plan to retain his employees for the whole life of each project For this purpose he has decided to devise training and development programs for them There are different options available for this purpose each with pros and cons Considering scarce funding small project tenure and his goal to provide fair opportunities for all he must decide which option best fits his organization s needs and resources Purchase Case and or Related Products Share Follow Us Ivey Publishing Search Ivey Cases Leadership Processes Leadership Skills and Values

    Original URL path: http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/research/leadership/cases/articles/training-and-development.htm (2013-06-03)
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